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Mary Edwards Friend of the Trust Award
 

Dave and Sandy Schupp were awarded the Granby Land Trust’s highest honor, the "Mary Edwards Friend of the Land Trust Award," at the GLT’s annual meeting on October 25 at Holcomb Farm. Pictured here, GLT board member Put Brown presents Dave with the award – a framed Laura Eden giclee print of the pond on the Mary Edwards Mountain Property.

In honor of Mary Edwards’ many contributions to Granby and the Granby Land Trust, the Land Trust Board has established the Mary Edwards Friend of the Trust Award.  This service award will be given annually to an individual or organization that has done – through a single gift or collectively over many years – the most to promote the GLT’s mission of “preserving Granby’s natural heritage.” It will be awarded at the Land Trust’s Annual Meeting and Hike in October.

Ray Betts, 2004 Recipient

Seth and Lucy Holcombe,
2005 Recipients

Robert Schlicht, 2006 Recipient

Paula and Lowell Johnson,
2007 Recipients

Dr. Forrest H. Davis, DVM, 2008 Recipient

Fred and Edith Wilhelm, 2009 Recipient

The Granby Board of Selectmen,
2010 Recipients

Put and Nannie Brown, 2011 Recipient

Dave Russell, 2012 Recipient

Sali Godard Riege, Barbara Godard and the Godard Family, 2013 Recipients

Rick Orluk and Trish Percival,
2014 Recipient
s

Dave and Sandy Schupp, 2015 Recipients

Ann Pelka, 2016 Recipient

News Releases

September 19, 2017
Art Show to Support Granby Land Trust

September 19, 2017
Learn About the Artistic Process From Acclaimed Artists

January 22, 2017
Granby Land Trust Holds New Year’s Day Hike

January 22, 2017
Granby Land Trust Featured in National Publication

November 11, 2016
Celebrate Nature at Annual Land Trust Art Show

September 19, 2016
Granby Land Trust and Granby Artists Association Host Annual Juried Art Show

November 13, 2015
Artists Provide Insights and More at GLT Art Talk

October 30, 2015
Granby Land Trust and Granby Artists Host 10th Annual Art Show

March 16, 2015
Granby Land Trust Offers Granby Oak Wood to Artists

November 26, 2014
Remembering Fred Wilhelm, Sr.

November 6, 2014
Rick Orluk and Trish Percival Receive GLT's Highest Award

September 4, 2014
Granby Land Trust Achieves National Recognition
Accreditation Awarded by the Land Trust Accreditation Commission

April 10, 2014
Granby Land Trust to Host Spring Bird Walks
Saturday, May 10 and Sunday, May 11

September 20, 2013
Granby Land Trust and Granby Artists Association Host 2013 BIG PAINT

August 8, 2013
GLT Invites Public Comments as Part of National Accreditation Application

November 11, 2012
Granby Land Trust Art Show Opening

December 2, 2010
GLT Awarded 60K Grant from Richard P. Garmany Fund at the Hartford Foundation

November 8, 2010
Granby Land Trust Art Show Opening

October 12, 2010
Granby Land Trust Presents
Our Scenic Valley: Preserving Its Beautiful Places
A Juried Art Show Opening

October 12, 2010
Granby Land Trust Preserve Our Properties Day

October 12, 2010
Granby Land Trust Annual Meeting and Celebration

May 13, 2010
Granby Oak Status Report: Truck Hits Branch

March 23, 2010
FORCES OF NATURE to be Performed at the Holcomb Farm on May 1 by Shirley Murtha

November 17, 2009
Land Trust Art Show Opening a Smashing Success!

October 29, 2009
Granby Oak Update provided by Arborworks

October 28, 2009
Fred and Edith Wilhelm Receive GLT’s
2009 Mary Edwards Friend of the Land Trust Award

October 18, 2009
Granby Land Trust Presents Preserving Granby One Square Foot At A Time A Juried Art Show Opening Thursday, November 5th

August 5, 2009
Join the Granby Land Trust and the Granby Artists Association for their Annual Granby’s Natural Landscape Plein Air Painting Event on September 13th

August 5, 2009
The Land Trust Mourns the Death of Seth Holcombe

May 9-10, 2009
Granby Land Trust Bird Walk Sightings

March 16, 2009
Granby Land Trust Announces Spring Event Schedule

January 19, 2009
The Land Trust Mourns the Death of Two Good Friends
And Celebrates Their Lives and Legacy

November 17, 2008
Granby Land Trust’s Granby’s Natural Waterscapes
Juried Art Show Award Winners Announced

October 20, 2008
Granby Land Trust Presents
Granby’s Natural Waterscapes
Juried Art Show: Art Show Opens Thursday, November 6th – Public Invited to Attend

August 17, 2008
Celebrating Granby's Natural Waterscapes
The Granby Land Trust and the Granby Artists Association Present a Talk, Property Tour, & Plein Air Painting Demonstrations on the beautiful Gamble Property in North Granby

July 11, 2008
Granby Land Trust's Mary Edwards Mountain Property Featured in Hartford Courant Click here to see link to story and video link

May 23, 2008
Legislative Victory for Land Conservation
Congress Passes Conservation Tax Incentive for Family Farms and Ranches

March 3 , 2008
Harry and Susan Werner Preserve a Wildlife Corridor

November 27, 2007
Put and Nannie Brown Donate Another Conservation Easement to Land Trust

November 11, 2007
Granby Land Trust’s Celebrating Granby’s Farms & Orchards Juried Art Show Award Winners Announced

November 5, 2007
Paula and Whitey Johnson Receive
GLT’s 2007 Mary Edwards Friend of the Land Trust Award

October 30 , 2007
Granby Land Trust Presents
Granby’s Farms & Orchards Juried Art Show: Art Show Opening This Thursday

September 17, 2007
Granby Land Trust Announces Fall Event Schedule

June 13, 2007
Buy Local, Support Farms

May 20, 2007
Feathered Travelers Need Rest Stops Too

May 20, 2007
Daisy Girl Scouts Earn Patch Letterboxing on Land Trust’s Godard Preserve

March 2007
Arborworks Donates Time and Service to Care for Granby Oak: Tree in Good Health

Newsletters
Fall 02 News

September 19, 2017
Art Show to Support Granby Land Trust
Opening Reception Thursday, October 26 at Lost Acres Vineyard

The Granby Land Trust and the Granby Artists Association are in their 12th year of showcasing inspiring art for an important cause – to help protect the land, water, and wildlife of Granby. To date, the Land Trust has protected more than 2,500 acres of open space, forests, wildlife habitat, agricultural land, water buffers, ecologically-sensitive areas, and scenic vistas in Granby.

Celebrating New England’s Natural Beauty is the theme of this extraordinary, juried show; and talented artists from across southern New England enter their art each year, creating a beautiful collection of fine art. All art is available for purchase, with a portion of sales benefiting the Granby Land Trust. The show will take place at the beautiful Lost Acres Vineyard in North Granby.

This year’s show will open on Thursday, October 26, from 5 to 8 PM, with an Opening Night that is not only the first chance for visitors to purchase art, but a fun night out on the town, as well, with as many as 150 people in attendance. All are welcome to join us for complimentary gourmet hors d’oeuvres and a glass of wine, while you socialize with friends, meet the artists, and enjoy the show. Awards will be presented at the Opening, as well.

Thanks to the incredible generosity of the GLT’s friends, the Show offers $5,000 in awards, making it popular with artists; and making it highly selective. Last year, 178 pieces of original artwork were submitted; just 77 were selected to be in the show.

Elana Chernick-Kritz, a gallery manager at R. Michelson Galleries in Northampton, Massachusetts, will serve as juror for this year’s show. R. Michelson Galleries is the largest commercial art gallery in western Massachusetts. Art originally exhibited there now hangs in many of the most prestigious museums in American, including the Metropolitan Museum of Art (New York), the Museum of Fine Arts (Boston), and the Art Institute of Chicago.

GLT President Rick Orluk says, “We hope this show will serve as a reminder of how beautiful and revitalizing the natural world is; and how imperative it is that we protect it.”

The Land Trust is grateful to Mark Wetzel and Fiduciary Investment Advisors, LLC and Ted Cormier and ALIRT Insurance Research, LLC for their ongoing, loyal support of the show.

The show will run through Sunday, November 26, at the Lost Acres Vineyard Art Gallery, 80 Lost Acres Road, in North Granby. Gallery hours are Friday and Saturday from 12 to 6 p.m.; Sunday from 12 to 5 p.m. For more information, visit granbylandtrust.org.

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September 19, 2017
Learn About the Artistic Process From Acclaimed Artists

All are invited to join the Granby Land Trust and the Granby Artists Association as they host an ART TALK, where area artists will discuss the artistic process and the methods they use to create their art. The discussion will be led by two incredibly talented artists, who we are lucky to have living in Granby and supporting the Granby Land Trust: Laura Eden and Bill Simpson. They will discuss their works and engage other artists in the discussion, as well. The event will take place in the Lost Acres Vineyard Art Gallery, where the Celebrating New England’s Natural Beauty Art Show will be on display. Complimentary refreshments will be served.

The event will be held on Thursday, November 9, from 7-9 PM, at Lost Acres Vineyard in North Granby. Go to www.GranbyLandTrust.org for more information on the Celebrating New England’s Natural Beauty Art Show.

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January 22, 2017
Granby Land Trust Holds New Year’s Day Hike

“In every walk with nature one receives more than he seeks.” (John Muir)

Twenty-five Granby Land Trust members and friends started the New Year right, taking a walk with nature at 9:00 a.m. on New Year’s Day. Led by Land Trust Board Member Fran Armentano, the walk took place on the spectacular Mary Edwards Mountain Property in North Granby. This was Fran’s 9th year in-a-row leading this walk! If you missed it this year, we hope you’ll join us next year!

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January 22, 2017
Granby Land Trust Featured in National Publication

The Granby Land Trust is excited to be featured (as the center spread, no less!) in the Winter 2017 issue of Saving Land magazine, a quarterly publication of the Land Trust Alliance. The magazine featured a beautiful mid-winter photo of the Mary Edwards Mountain Preserve, taken by our talented volunteer photographer, Peter Dinella.

When asked to submit an article about the Granby Land Trust, the GLT Board knew exactly what they wanted the subject of the article to be: 1) saving land is as much about people as it is about land; and 2) you can’t build a land trust without first building trust.

The Land Trust Alliance is a national land conservation organization that works to save the places people need and love by strengthening land conservation across America. The Alliance represents more than 1,100 member land trusts supported by more than five million members nationwide. The Alliance is based in Washington, D.C.

The Granby Land Trust works to preserve Granby natural heritage through the conservation of its scenic vistas, open space corridors, wildlife habitat, ecologically sensitive areas, and agricultural land. Founded in 1972, the Land Trust owns approximately 1,385 acres and has preserved another 1,010 acres through conservation easements. To learn more about the Granby Land Trust, go to granbylandtrust.org and become our friend on Facebook.

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November 11, 2016
Celebrate Nature at Annual Land Trust Art Show

Vincent Van Gogh said, "Keep your love of nature, for that is the true way to understand art more and more."

Artists throughout history have depicted the natural world in its glory. Through November 27, at Lost Acres Vineyard in North Granby, you can see how artists from across New England have depicted that natural world in Celebrating New England’s Natural Beauty, a juried art show hosted by the Granby Land Trust and the Granby Artists Association. All art is available for purchase, with a portion of sales benefitting the Granby Land Trust.

"We hope to remind artists, art lovers, and anyone else who happens upon this beautiful art to keep their love of nature," says GLT President Rick Orluk. "Seeing these beautiful scenes should serve as a reminder to all of us of how beautiful and revitalizing the natural world is; and how imperative it is that we protect it."

Each November since 2005, the Granby Land Trust and the Granby Artists Association have worked together to create a juried art show. Today, thanks to the incredible generosity of the GLT's friends, the show offers a remarkable $5,000 in award money and the event has become something the community looks forward to each fall. This year, 178 pieces of original artwork were submitted; just 77 were selected to be in the show.

Will Lustenader, an accomplished artist who teaches at Choate Rosemary Hall in Wallingford, Connecticut, juried this year’s show.

The winner of the show’s top prize — the Don and Marty Wilmot Award — is Kate Tortland, for her painting Holcomb Overlook. Alexander Anisimov was awarded the show’s second place prize, the Granby Land Trust Award, for his painting titled Mountain Top.

Fourteen additional prizes were awarded as follows: Catherine Elliott won the Sandy and Dave Schupp Award for Morning Paint. Bill Hanson won the Austin J. McNey Memorial Award given by Karen, Scott & Patrick McNey for Salmon Brook, East Branch. Carole Hartwell won the Stephen Brown Memorial Award for Mary Edwards’ Mountain. The Ray Betts Award, given by Carol and Greg Reid, went to Bill Manocchi for Grey Barn. Rick Daskam won the Granby Artists Association Award for Phillips Farm. Douglas Williams won the Helen and Al Wilke Award for A New Day. Del-Bourree Bach won the Mildred Dewey Award, given by Jenny and Dave Emery, for A Winter’s Tail. Jim Laurino won the Matthew K. Orluk Award, given by Trish Percival and Rick Orluk, for Creamery Hill Horse Barn. Michael Patnode won the Olof Stevenson Award, given by Jamie Gamble, for A Fall Day. Alan Izatt won the Tudor and Laura Holcomb Award, given by Nannie and Put Brown, for Lampson Brook Farm. The William Stewart Award, given by Dave and Judy Russell, went to Margot Callahan for August Afternoon. Kristen Cormier won the Salmon Brook Watershed Association Award for Reflection #6. You can see all of these beautiful works of art through November 27.

New this year, a People’s Choice Award is being offered by Lost Acres Vineyard. For this award, guests get to vote for their favorite artwork each time they visit the show. Votes will be tallied at the end of the show (November 27) and the winner will be announced then.

Also this year, the GLT is auctioning off a coffee table created from the fallen branches of the majestic Dewey-Granby Oak. This incredible, handcrafted table, which was created by West Granby resident Brenon Plourde and donated to the Granby Land Trust for its benefit, is on display at Lost Acres Vineyard. Anyone interested in bidding on this magnificent work of art should speak with the vintners at the wine counter or call Rick Orluk at 860-653-7095. The Land Trust is grateful to Brenon for this incredibly meaningful and generous donation to the GLT.

The Land Trust also is grateful to Mark Wetzel and Fiduciary Investment Advisors, LLC and Ted Cormier and ALIRT Insurance Research, LLC for their ongoing, loyal support of the show. In addition, the Land Trust thanks event co-chairs Els Fonteyne and Laurie Schock for organizing the show’s Opening Night; Bill Simpson and Laura Eden for their wise counsel, advice and hard work and for organizing the show’s Art Talk; and Michelle Niedermeyer and Kevin Riggott of Lost Acres Vineyard for hosting the show. Lastly, the GLT thanks Tony Capelli for his beautiful floral arrangements and Karen Rutigliano for creating delicious appetizers for Opening Night.

The show runs through November 27 at Lost Acres Vineyard, 80 Lost Acres Road, in North Granby. Gallery hours are Friday and Saturday from 12 to 6 p.m.; Sunday from 12 to 5 p.m. For more information, visit granbylandtrust.org.

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September 19, 2016
Granby Land Trust and Granby Artists Association Host Annual Juried Art Show
Show Opens October 27

Mark your calendars! On October 27, from 5:00 to 8:00 PM, the Granby Land Trust and the Granby Artists Association will officially open their 11th annual juried art show, featuring artworks that highlight New England’s natural beauty. The show, which will run through November 27, will be held at the beautiful Lost Acres Vineyard in North Granby. Nearly 200 artists, art aficionados, and friends of the Granby Land Trust turn out for the show’s Opening Night each year, and we expect the same to happen this year. The free event is catered; and each guest is offered a glass of wine, compliments of Lost Acres Vineyard. It is at this event that the Land Trust awards more than $5,000 in awards to the artists.

If you can’t make it to the Opening, you can visit the show through November 27 (during Vineyard hours: Friday and Saturday, 12-6 PM; Sunday 12-5 PM). All art is for sale, with a portion of proceeds benefitting the Granby Land Trust.

 

Learn More About the Art – ART TALK – Thursday, November 10

You also are invited to join artists Laura Eden, Bill Simpson, and others on Thursday, November 10, from 7 to 9 PM, for a deeper exploration of a number of the paintings entered in this year’s show. Complimentary light refreshments will be served and wine will be available for purchase. Space is limited for this free event, so please register with Laurie Schock at sgschock@cox.net.

To learn more about the Granby Land Trust and its upcoming events,
visit www.GranbyLandTrust.org or become a friend of the GLT on Facebook.

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November 13, 2015
Artists Provide Insights and More at GLT Art Talk

“This is so exciting, I just want to soak this all in,” said Steve Linde, an accomplished artist and high school art teacher. “I’m used to talking to teenagers. You all are still listening!”

In fact, about 45 people (admittedly, all adults) were hanging on Steve’s every word.

They had come together to hear Steve and other artists discuss their techniques, their artistic processes,

 

Steve Linde, winner of the Helen and Al Wilke Award for his pastel, "Luminous Landscape," discusses his personal style and artistic process at the first annual Art Talk, hosted by the Granby Land Trust.

and their inspirations at the Granby Land Trust’s Art Talk, held as part of the GLT Art Show: Celebrating New England’s Natural Beauty (on display through November 29 at the gallery at Lost Acres Vineyard in North Granby).

New this year, the Art Talk is designed to give people a chance to appreciate the artists and artworks in the show at a deeper level.

Five artists gave short presentations about their work: Steve Linde discussed his work with pastels; Nina Ritson discussed her etching technique; Bob Noreika talked about his acrylic painting style; Laura Eden described her unique method of working with egg tempera; and Bill Simpson discussed the process of applying oil to canvas.

Everyone agreed the evening was educational and inspiring and that it should be repeated. So if you weren’t able to attend this year, perhaps you can join us next year.
The GLT thanks Bill Simpson, Laura Eden and Laurie Schock for organizing the event; as well as Michelle Niedermeyer and Kevin Riggott for hosting it at their beautiful vineyard.

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October 30, 2015
Granby Land Trust and Granby Artists Host 10th Annual Art Show

 

Laura Eden won the Don and Marty Wilmot Award for her egg tempera painting, "After the Rain," inspired by a scenic location in McLean’s Game Refuge. photo by Peter Dinella

Ten years ago, Granby Land Trust President Rick Orluk had a vision: to create a juried art show that celebrated Granby’s natural beauty. With the support of the GLT board of directors, he asked Carole Day and members of the Granby Artists Association for their help. He then approached a number of GLT supporters to ask for their financial backing. Before long, the Land Trust had an event sponsor and the funding to create 10 substantial awards. GLT members, GAA members and friends jumped into action to plan the event and, in November of 2005, the first show was held at the J.Vallee Brunelle Fine Art & Framing.

Each November since, the Granby Land Trust and the Granby Artists Association have worked together to expand and improve the show. Today, thanks to the incredible generosity of the GLT’s friends, the show offers a remarkable $5,000 in award money and the event has become something the community looks forward to each fall. This year, a record 180 pieces of original artwork were submitted (the juror had to select just 80 to be in the show); and nearly 200 people turned out for Opening Night at Lost Acres Vineyard.

Entitled Celebrating New England’s Natural Beauty, this year’s show encompasses artwork inspired by beautiful, natural places across New England. Paul Gulla, Gallery Manager at R.Michelson Galleries in Northampton, Mass., juried this year’s show. A portion of art sales benefits the Granby Land Trust.
The winner of the show’s top prize – the Don and Marty Wilmot Award – was Laura Eden for her painting After the Rain. Caroline Mecartney won the show’s second place prize, the Granby Land Trust Award, for her painting titled Honeymoon Cabin.

 

Caroline Mecartney won the Granby Land Trust Award for her oil painting titled, "Honeymoon Cabin," which depicts the small cabin that sits on conserved property owned by Put and Nannie Brown.

There were 14 additional prizes, awarded as follows: Jean-Luc Godard won the Austin J. McNey Memorial Award given by Karen, Scott & Patrick McNey for La Morille. Marija P. McCarthy won the Granby Artists Association Award for Boats at Hyannis, MA. Bill Simpson won the Stephen Brown Memorial Award for Near the Sea. Diane Caswell Christian won the Sandy and Dave Schupp Award for Enders. Steve Linde won the Helen and Al Wilke Award for Luminous Landscape. Mary Lang Killilea won the Mildred Dewey Award, given by Jenny and Dave Emery, for Sailboat on Hamburg Cove. Karen Hudson won the Matthew K. Orluk Award, given by Trish Percival and Rick Orluk, for Autumn Bliss. Suzanne Roz Magoon won the Olof Stevenson Award, given by Jamie Gamble, for Beaver’s Home II. Lindsey Molyneux won the Tudor and Laura Holcomb Award, given by Nannie and Put Brown, for Arab. The Ray Betts Award, given by Carol and Greg Reid, went to Bob Noreika for Spicey Chickens. The William Stewart Award, given by Dave and Judy Russell, went to John C. Walker for Fresh Snowfall. Elizabeth Rhoades won the Salmon Brook Watershed Association Award for A Silence in the Marsh. New this year, a People’s Choice Award is being offered by Lost Acres Vineyard. For this award, guests get to vote for their favorite artwork each time they visit the show. Votes will be tallied at the end of the show (November 29) and the winner will be announced then.

The Land Trust thanks Mark Wetzel and Fiduciary Investment Advisors, LLC and Ted Cormier and ALIRT Insurance Research, LLC for their ongoing, loyal support of the show. In addition, the Land Trust thanks event co-chairs Els Fonteyne and Laurie Schock for organizing yet another successful Opening Night; Bill Simpson and Laura Eden for their wise counsel, advice and hard work; and Michelle Niedermeyer and Kevin Riggott of Lost Acres Vineyard for hosting Opening Night and the show. Also, the GLT thanks Tony Capelli for his beautiful floral arrangements and Karen Rutigliano of Katering by Karen for the delicious appetizers she served at Opening Night.

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March 16, 2015
Granby Land Trust Offers Granby Oak Wood to Artists

Proposal Form can be found here.

A few years ago, our beloved Granby Oak suffered a number of broken limbs after a major snowstorm. The Granby Land Trust salvaged what wood we could from the tree; and Arborist Brian Watkins and Board Member Dave Emery have been kind enough to store it for us.

Now that it is cured, we invite artists and woodworkers to submit suggestions for projects that will utilize this magnificent tree’s wood.

If you are interested in creating something of lasting value with genuine Granby Oak wood, please complete a proposal and submit it to: Granby Oak Proposals, Granby Land Trust, P.O. Box 23, Granby, CT 06035; or submit via email to granbyoak@cox.net.

We will award wood to worthy applicants on a first-come, first-served basis. Any questions can be directed to granbyoak@cox.net.

We look forward to hearing your ideas!

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November 26, 2014
Remembering Fred Wilhelm, Sr.
(July 11, 1921 - November 7, 2014)

 

A young Fred Wilhelm, Sr. haying their North Granby field with his dad Oscar (in the wagon) in 1939.

 

When Frederick Oscar Wilhelm was a student at Wesleyan University, he brought home the seed of a honey locust tree, which he planted in the yard of his family's home in North Granby. Today, that tree is believed to be the biggest honey locust tree in Connecticut, having thrived on Wilhelm Farm for the last 76 years.

While most of us knew Fred as a farmer, he also was a man of letters and a lover of literature, and this tree seems an apt symbol indeed for a man who so deeply appreciated nature and the ways of the earth; a man to whom stewardship of the land and forests in Granby was of the utmost importance; a man who himself stood tall – as a pillar of this community – dedicated to Granby and to making it a better place to live; and a man who thrived, indeed, in the place where he was planted: Wilhelm Farm.

Fred first moved to the farm with his parents when he was almost 15 years old. After college, service in the U.S. Army during World War II, and two graduate degrees, Fred, with his wife, Edith, moved back to the farm. There, they raised five beautiful children (Margaret, Katherine, Ann, Carolyn, and Fred) and built a full and fruitful life together.

Fred was employed as an English instructor and later as an administrator at the University of Connecticut, but his vocation was farming, and for many years he and Edith raised livestock and vegetables and managed the forest of the family farm. (Their daughter Ann and her husband Bill Bentley continue, as third-generation owners, to manage the farm today.)

While it’s hard to imagine he had much spare time with a job, five children, and a farm to run, Fred somehow managed to serve his town in major volunteer roles -- as the Town of Granby Treasurer; on the Board of Education; and on the Planning and Zoning Commission. He was active for many years in the Republican Town Committee and was recognized by his peers as the Republican of the Year in 2005. Fred wrote for The Granby Drummer, served as president of the Granby Cemetery Association, and was an active member of the Salmon Brook Historical Society. First Congregational Church of Granby was a central part of Fred's life.

Fred was passionate about the land he lived on and about preserving the rural aspects of Granby. When he moved here in 1936, Granby was a farming community, with a population of fewer than 1,500 people. Over the next few decades, Fred witnessed rapid growth throughout Hartford County, and he realized the importance of preserving open space – particularly agricultural land – here in Granby. He became a stalwart supporter of the Granby Land Trust and he played a key role in the GLT's growth. In 1994, Fred and Edith generously donated a conservation easement on Wilhelm Farm to the Granby Land Trust. The easement precludes development and allows only agricultural and forestry activities on 48 acres of land, so that Wilhelm Farm will remain a farm forever.  In recognition of Fred and Edith's support of the Land Trust and land preservation efforts in general, in 2009, they received the GLT's highest honor, The Mary Edwards Friend of the Land Trust Award.

After his memorial service, Fred’s wife of 57 years, 5 children and 11 grandchildren returned to Wilhelm Farm, where they planted a Gingko tree in his memory – not far from where Fred planted that honey locust tree as a young man. A symbol of longevity, hope, resilience, and peace, the Gingko tree seems a fitting tribute indeed to this hard-working, intelligent man who lived a rich and fruitful 93 years on this earth and who did so much for our town; perhaps most notably by helping preserve its rural landscape. One looks forward to seeing both of the trees leafing out in the spring – one planted by a young Fred Wilhelm starting out in the world and one planted in his memory – side-by-side on the land Fred Wilhelm loved.

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November 6, 2014
Rick Orluk and Trish Percival Receive GLT's Highest Award

by Shirley Murtha

 

Trish Percival and Rick Orluk received the 2014 Mary Edwards Friend of the Land Trust Award at the organization's annual meeting on October 5.  photo by Peter Dinella

 

Every year the Granby Land Trust awards its highest honor, the Mary Edwards Friend of the Land Trust Award, to someone who has contributed significantly to the success of the organization. This year's recipients, Granby Land Trust President Rick Orluk and his wife Trish Percival, have been nominated repeatedly, but every year, the couple has declined the honor in order that someone else's important contributions be recognized. This year, the pressure was just too great and they finally acquiesced.

In delivering the award, Land Trust member Put Brown noted that whenever Orluk and Percival describe the many positive outcomes they have engineered, they always give credit to all who have worked on the project; they never give credit to themselves. "But we all know better," said Brown. "They are the hardest workers among us — the ones who offer the best ideas, build partnerships, nourish relationships and inspire others by the diligence and passion."

It was Orluk and Percival who created the sophisticated and engaging website, recognized for its excellence by the Connecticut Land Conservation Council. They have worked with donors large and small to build coalitions to preserve some of Granby's most important scenic vistas, wildlife habitats, recreational corridors and working farms. Most recently, they oversaw the massive effort needed to achieve the Land Trust's national accreditation.

It is true that they did not do any of these things alone, but their leadership was crucial to each success, and it was with profound gratitude that the Land Trust members were finally able to express their respect and admiration to the couple.

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September 4, 2014
Granby Land Trust Achieves National Recognition
Accreditation Awarded by the Land Trust Accreditation Commission

GRANBY, CT – The Granby Land Trust has achieved national accreditation from the Land Trust Accreditation Commission, an independent program of the Land Trust Alliance.

“The Granby Land Trust’s accredited status demonstrates our commitment to permanent land conservation that benefits the entire community,” says GLT President Rick Orluk. “We are a stronger organization today having gone through the rigorous accreditation program.” 

Founded in 1972, the Granby Land Trust seeks to preserve Granby’s natural heritage by protecting Granby’s scenic vistas, open space corridors, ecologically sensitive areas, and agricultural land. The Land Trust accomplishes this mission through land acquisition, conservation easements, and partnerships with fellow organizations that seek to protect open space. Currently, the Granby Land Trust protects more than 2,200 acres of open space in Granby.

To be accredited, land trusts must meet national standards for excellence, uphold the public trust and ensure that conservation efforts are permanent.

The Granby Land Trust was awarded accreditation this August and is one of only 280 land trusts from across the country (and one of ten in Connecticut) that has been awarded accreditation since the accreditation program commenced in the fall of 2008. Accredited land trusts are authorized to display the accreditation seal – a mark of distinction in land conservation.

“This round of accreditation decisions represents another significant milestone for the accreditation program; the 280 accredited land trusts account for over half of the 20,645,165 acres currently owned in fee or protected by a conservation easement held by a land trust,” said Commission Executive Director Tammara Van Ryn. “Accreditation provides the public with an assurance that, at the time of accreditation, land trusts meet high standards for quality and that the results of their conservation work are permanent.”

Each accredited land trust submitted extensive documentation and underwent a rigorous review. “Through accreditation land trusts conduct important planning and make their operations more efficient and strategic,” said Van Ryn. “Accredited organizations have engaged and trained citizen conservation leaders and improved systems for ensuring that their conservation work is permanent.”

Conserving land helps ensure clean air and drinking water; safe, healthy food; scenic landscapes and views; recreational places; and habitat for the diversity of life on earth. In addition to health and food benefits, conserving land increases property values near greenbelts, saves tax dollars by encouraging more efficient development, and reduces the need for expensive water filtration facilities. Across the country, local citizens and communities have come together to form more than 1,700 land trusts to save the places they love. Community leaders in land trusts throughout the country have worked with willing landowners to save over 47 million acres of farms, forests, parks and places people care about, including land transferred to public agencies and protected via other means. Strong, well-managed land trusts provide local communities with effective champions and caretakers of their critical land resources, and safeguard the land through the generations.

“Our national accreditation is a result of many years of commitment by Granby Land Trust board members, members-at-large, town officials and generous land donors,” says Orluk.  “On behalf of the GLT Board of Directors, we thank each of you for creating such a vibrant organization.”

About the Granby Land Trust
Since its founding in 1972, the Granby Land Trust has worked to preserve Granby's natural heritage through the conservation of its scenic vistas, open space corridors, wildlife habitat, ecologically sensitive areas, and agricultural land. For more information about the Granby Land Trust, please visit www.granbylandtrust.org.

About the Land Trust Accreditation Commission
The Land Trust Accreditation Commission, based in Saratoga Springs, N.Y., awards the accreditation seal to community institutions that meet national quality standards for protecting important natural places and working lands forever. The Commission, established in 2006 as an independent program of the Land Trust Alliance, is governed by a volunteer board of diverse land conservation and nonprofit management experts from around the country. See a complete list of all six recently accredited land trusts online at http://www.landtrustaccreditation.org/newsroom/press-releases. More information on the accreditation program is available on the Commission’s website, www.landtrustaccreditation.org.

About The Land Trust Alliance
The Land Trust Alliance, of which The Granby Land Trust is a member, is a national conservation group that works to save the places people love by strengthening conservation throughout America. It works to increase the pace and quality of conservation by advocating favorable tax policies, training land trusts in best practices and working to ensure the permanence of conservation in the face of continuing threats. The Alliance publishes Land Trust Standards and Practices and provides financial and administrative support to the Commission. It has established an endowment to help ensure the success of the accreditation program and keep it affordable for land trusts of all sizes to participate in accreditation. More information can be found at www.landtrustalliance.org.

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April 10, 2014
Granby Land Trust to Host Spring Bird Walks
Saturday, May 10 and Sunday, May 11

GRANBY, CT – The Granby Land Trust is offering two Spring Bird Walks on Saturday, May 10 and Sunday, May 11, from 7:00 AM to 9:00 AM each morning. Led by Land Trust members and avid birders John Weeks and Christine Chinni, the walks will be held on Jamie Gamble’s beautiful North Granby property off of Loomis Street. Over the last decade, these popular walks have become a Land Trust tradition.

The birds are very active at this time of year, as they return from a winter away, and the Gamble property provides an ideal place in which to view them. You don't have to be a birder to enjoy this quiet morning in the woods, and participants of all ages will enjoy seeing how John brings birds right up close to the group by playing their songs on his MP3 player.

Recent Spring bird walks on Granby Land Trust properties have featured sightings of more than 50 bird species! Beautiful birds that we regularly see include Baltimore Oriole, Scarlet Tanager, Rose-breasted Grosbeak and a dozen different kinds of warblers (the "tropical butterflies" of the bird world). Three hawks are resident and often put in an appearance: Red-tailed Hawk, Broad-winged Hawk and Red-shouldered Hawk. Last year, for the first time, Great Blue Herons tried to nest in one of the swamps on the property; we usually see one or two of them, and they may attempt to nest again.

Birders should bring binoculars and be ready to start hiking promptly at 7:00AM. The Gamble property is located at 253 Loomis Street, almost as far north as the Massachusetts state line. Look for a Land Trust banner marking the entrance. This is only a property address; there is no house at this location. In the event of rain, please check the GLT Facebook page for an update on the status of the events (significant showers will cancel the walks).

The walks are open to the public, but space is limited and they typically “sell out” every year, so register early. RSVP to John Weeks by calling 860.844.8965 or by email at aerie.john@cox.net.

Since its founding in 1972, the Granby Land Trust has worked to preserve Granby's Natural Heritage through the conservation of its scenic vistas, open space corridors, wildlife habitat, ecologically sensitive areas, and agricultural land. For more information about this or other upcoming Granby Land Trust events, please visit our website at www.GranbyLandTrust.org.

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September 20, 2013
Granby Land Trust and Granby Artists Association Host 2013 BIG PAINT
October 6 in West Granby

Catherine Elliott works on an oil painting at the 2012 BIG PAINT event at Lost Acres Vineyard. This year’s BIG PAINT will be held on October 6th from 9 AM - noon at Holcomb Farm and the Garlic Farm.

 

The Granby Land Trust and the Granby Artists Association invite all artists, Land Trust members, and the public at large to join them for the 2013 BIG PAINT, a plein air painting event, on October 6 from 9 AM until 12 noon. The year’s BIG PAINT will be held at two of West Granby’s beautiful agricultural properties: Holcomb Farm and the neighboring Garlic Farm on Simsbury Road in West Granby.

An annual event, the BIG PAINT draws artists from across New England, including highly-esteemed artists from the Connecticut Plein Air Painters Society and the Granby Artists Association.

Artists are encouraged to come early in order to find the vista they would like to capture, in whatever artistic medium they would like to use (we’ve seen artists work in watercolor, egg tempera, felt, pottery, sculpture, and more at past events).

Catherine Elliott’s finished product, “Autumn Grapes,” went on to win the 2012 Art Show’s Granby Land Trust Award, the show’s second place prize. This year’s Art Show Opening will be held on November 6th from 5 – 8 PM at Lost Acres Vineyard.

 

The public is encouraged to walk both farm properties, see the artists’ work as it take shape, and ask the artists questions. Breakfast refreshments - coffee, juice, bagels, donuts, and fruit - will be provided on a complimentary basis to both artists and guests.

Many of the artists will be preparing work for submission to the upcoming juried art show - Art & Agriculture: Celebrating the Farmington Valley's Beautiful Places, which will run November 6 through December 8 at Lost Acres Vineyard in North Granby. Artist Carli Freeman, a formally trained artist and the manager of Art Essex Gallery in Essex, will jury the show, which features awards totaling nearly $5,000.

All are invited to the show’s Opening Night, on Wednesday, November 6, from 5 to 8 PM at Lost Acres Vineyard.

The Garlic Farm is located at 76 Simsbury Road in West Granby and Holcomb Farm is right next door at 113 Simsbury Road. Parking is available at both properties. Artist check-in located at Holcomb Farm.

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August 8, 2013
GLT Invites Public Comments as Part of National Accreditation Application

Granby, CT – As part of its application for national accreditation through the Land Trust Alliance, the Granby Land Trust (GLT) invites members of the Granby community to express their viewpoints on how the GLT complies with national quality standards.

The Land Trust Alliance (LTA) is a national conservation organization whose mission is “to save the places people love by strengthening land conservation across America.” The LTA’s accreditation program recognizes land conservation organizations that meet national quality standards for protecting important natural places and working lands forever.

The Land Trust Accreditation Commission, an independent program of the Land Trust Alliance, conducts an extensive review of the policies and programs of each accreditation applicant.  Applying for accreditation is a rigorous and extensive undertaking, and it has led the Granby Land Trust to review, analyze and improve its operations, policies and administrative procedures.  This process is expanding the organization's capacity and will make the GLT an even stronger and more effective land trust.

As part of its review, the Accreditation Commission invites public input and accepts signed, written comments on pending applications. Comments must relate to how the Granby Land Trust complies with national quality standards. These standards address the ethical and technical operation of a land trust. For the full list of standards, see http://www.landtrustaccreditation.org/tips-and-tools/indicator-practices.

To learn more about the accreditation program or to submit a comment concerning the Granby Land Trust, visit www.landtrustaccreditation.org or email your comment to info@landtrustaccreditation.org.   Comments may also be faxed or mailed to the Land Trust Accreditation Commission, Attn: Public Comments: (fax) 518-587-3183; (mail) 36 Phila Street, Suite 2, Saratoga Springs, NY 12866.  

To learn more about the Granby Land Trust's current activities, please visit our website at www.GranbyLandTrust.org.  Comments on the Granby Land Trust’s application will be most useful if they are received by October 15, 2013.

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November 11, 2012
Granby Land Trust Art Show Opening

Nearly 200 people attended the Opening of the Granby Land Trust’s 7th Annual Art Show, held on November 1st at the Lost Acres Orchard.

 

Granby, CT – A new and bigger venue brought a larger-than-even crowd to the opening night of the Granby Land Trust’s 7th annual juried art show, presented in partnership with the Granby Artists Association. Nearly 200 people attended the opening, which was held at the beautiful Lost Acres Vineyard on November 1st – almost double the number who attended the first show’s opening night, back in 2005 – and more than have attended any show in the show’s history.

This year’s show, entitled, Places of Inspiration: Celebrating the Farmington Valley’s Natural Beauty, highlights the beauty of not only Granby, but of the entire Farmington Valley. Artists from New York, Rhode Island, Massachusetts, and Connecticut submitted art inspired by such beautiful places as the Salmon Brook, McLean’s Game Refuge, the Hillstead Museum, Stratton Brook Park, and the Enders State Forest. Much of the art was inspired by the Big Paint, an event hosted by the Land Trust back in September, which drew about 50 artists to Lost Acres Vineyard for a day of painting (and one artist sculpting!) en plein air.

Juried by John LoPresti, this year’s show drew more than 130 pieces of original artwork (painted, drawn, photographed or 3-D), inspired by scenes that capture the beauty of the Farmington Valley. Eighty pieces were selected for the show.

Jim Laurino’s painting, Carving Up the Flats, won the Marty and Don Wilmot Award – top honors – at the show.

 

The winner of the show’s top prize – the Don and Marty Wilmot Award - was Jim Laurino for his oil painting Carving Up the Flats. Catherine Elliott won the show’s second place prize, the Granby Land Trust Award, for her oil painting titled Autumn Grapes. And Justine Coleman won the Granby Community Fund Award for her watercolor, Out for a Catch.

There were 13 additional prizes awarded as follows: William Simpson won the Austin J. McNey Memorial Award given by Karen, Scott & Patrick McNey for Nightlight #4 “City Lights.” Paul Batch won the Stephen Brown Memorial Award for Farmington Pines. Charles Wilhelm won the Granby Artists Association Award for Newgate. The Ray Betts Award, given by Carol and Greg Reid, went to Steve Linde for Lost Acres Morning. Patricia Louise Corbett won the Tudor and Laura Holcomb Award, given by Nannie and Put Brown, for Beside Still Water. Scott McNey won the Matthew K. Orluk Award, given by Trish Percival and Rick Orluk, for Barn Door Hills After Ice Storm. Ralph Acosta won the Mildred Dewey Award, given by Jenny and Dave Emery, for Valley Express – Enders. James Magner won the Olof Stevenson Award, given by Jamie Gamble, for Lost Acres Vineyard. Laura Eden won the Salmon Brook Watershed Association Award for Below the Gorge. The William Stewart Award, given by Dave and Judy Russell, went to Hannah Libman for At the Reservior. And Alexander Anisimov won the Sandy and Dave Schupp Award for Wild Fields.

Autumn Grapes, an oil painting by Catherine Elliott, won the Granby Land Trust Award (second place) at the show.

 

This year’s prize money totaled nearly $5,000, outstanding for a show of this size. Granby Land Trust President Rick Orluk says, “The Land Trust receives a remarkable level of support from our sponsors, our community, the Granby Artists Association, and each of the award donors, and we are truly appreciative.”

Orluk opened his comments at the show by quoting French artist Edgar Degas, saying, “Art is not what you see, but what you make others see.

“These artists find inspiration in waterfalls, sunsets, falling leaves, and misty mornings,” says Orluk. “In turn, they inspire us with their interpretations of this natural beauty. And when we see their works collected – all in one room, all at once – the importance of preserving our natural world becomes more evident than ever.”

The annual art show is presented by Mark Wetzel and Fiduciary Investment Advisors, LLC; as well as Ted Cormier and ALIRT Insurance Research LLC. The Granby Land Trust thanks them for their loyal support. The Land Trusts also thanks Tony Capelli, who provided beautiful floral arrangements for the show’s opening; Susan Accetura of Lost Acres Orchard, who served up some delicious Orchard specialties to the hungry crowd; and Michelle Niedermeyer and Kevin Riggott, the owners of the Lost Acres Vineyard, who welcomed the Land Trust and its enthusiastic followers with open arms (and a complimentary glass of wine per person!). Last but not least, the Land Trust thanks event co-chairs Laurie Schock and Katy Attianese for doing such a wonderful job of making sure the Opening Night was a big success.

The show will run through December 1st at the Lost Acres Vineyard, 80 Lost Acres Road, in North Granby. Gallery hours are Friday and Saturday, 11 AM to 6 PM, and Sunday 12 to 5 PM. “Anyone who appreciates the Farmington Valley’s beauty should seize this opportunity to see beautiful art, inspired by beautiful scenery, in a beautiful setting,” says Orluk.

All of the art is for sale, as is Lost Acres Vineyard’s wine, and a portion of all art sales benefits the Land Trust.

December 2, 2010
GLT Awarded 60K Grant from Richard P. Garmany Fund
at the Hartford Foundation

A 38-acre mountaintop wilderness in Granby and a 73-acre forest on a historic Simsbury farm will be preserved thanks, in part, to two grants from the Hartford Foundation for Public Giving. A third grant will improve water quality monitoring in towns along the lower Farmington River.

The grants, totaling more than $160,000, were awarded to the Granby and Simsbury Land Trusts and the Farmington River Watershed Association by the Richard P. Garmany Fund at the Hartford Foundation. Mr. Garmany, who was a resident of Avon and an executive of Aetna, established the fund shortly before his death in 2008. Receiving grants were:

  • The Granby Land Trust - $60,000 to help preserve 38 acres of undeveloped land in the area of Old Messenger Road in West Granby. The property will be known as the Garmany Preserve. Additional funding was awarded by the Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection.

Virtually untouched by roads or development, and home to a variety of wildlife, the parcel abuts Granby Land Trust property on two sides. Its purchase will create a link to provide access to 325 contiguous preserved acres and the opportunity to create a system of hiking, nature and cross-country ski trails across at least 262 of those acres. Besides its natural beauty, the land contains stone walls and old stone cellars, remnants of the generations of the Messenger family who lived on the land for more than 150 years.

“The Granby Land Trust is extremely grateful to the Richard P. Garmany Fund at the Hartford Foundation for helping make possible the preservation of this beautiful property and for providing us with the financial support to build a trail system upon it,” said Rick Orluk, Granby Land Trust president.

  • The Simsbury Land Trust - $75,000 to help purchase the development rights to a 73-acre forest on the south side of Tulmeadow Farm off Farms Village Road, completing a seven-year effort to protect the entire 260-acre farm from development. Additional funding comes from the U.S. Forest Service’s 2010 Forest Legacy Program, the State of Connecticut and private donations.

The purchase also will provide a link to other protected land. The southern boundary abuts a substantial east/west corridor of several hundred acres consisting of Town-owned open space, the rail bed connecting Stratton Pond State Park with the Ethel Walker Woods and Town Forest Park. Flamig Farm, protected by the Town’s purchase of development rights, is adjacent on the west; the remainder of Tulmeadow Farm, already protected, is on the north, leading to the ridge corridor beyond.

The Land Trust purchased development rights to 187 acres in 2004, with the aid of a $150,000 grant from the Hartford Foundation. Although the Tuller family maintains ownership – as it has since 1768 – any sale could only be for agricultural purposes, not for more lucrative commercial development. Surveys have indicated that more than 130 homes could be built on the farm, including 42 on the forest land.

“Sale of the development rights to the Simsbury Land Trust ensures that the forest will remain a viable and treasured community landmark for public use, in perpetuity,” said Amy Zeiner, executive director of the Land Trust.

  • The Farmington River Watershed Association - $27,500 for its water quality monitoring program that tracks the river’s ability to support aquatic life and safe recreation.  The Farmington River is the primary source of clean drinking water for Greater Hartford.

The grant will enable the agency to purchase an additional system for incubating bacteria samples, and a high-quality stereo microscope and lighting system for identifying the stream macro-invertebrates that are indicators of water quality.

“Because we check surface water quality frequently, our work in the lower Farmington River area helps the towns and the state identify areas that may need further attention or action,” explained Alisa Phillips-Griggs, water quality and projects coordinator. “If there’s a continuous record of water quality for a particular spot, it’s easier to document a change for better or worse over time.” Much of the work is carried out by volunteers who have expertise in the procedures. Lab space is provided by the Town of Simsbury.

Hartford Foundation for Public Giving
The Hartford Foundation for Public Giving is the community foundation for the 29-town Greater Hartford region, dedicated to improving the quality of life for area residents for the past 85 years. The Foundation receives gifts from thousands of generous individuals and families, and last year, awarded grants of more than $25 million to a broad range of area nonprofit organizations. For more information about the Hartford Foundation, visit www.hfpg.org or call 860-548-1888.

Granby Land Trust
Founded in 1972, the Granby Land Trust owns approximately 1,100 acres in Granby and has preserved another 900 acres through conservation easements. For more information, please visit www.GranbyLandTrust.org.

Simsbury Land Trust
Established in 1976, the Simsbury Land Trust owns land or interests in land at 30 locations totaling 832 acres. For more information, please visit www.simsburylandtrust.org.

Farmington River Watershed Association
The Farmington River Watershed Association conducts research, education and advocacy programs to fulfill its mission of protecting the Farmington River and the natural resources of its watershed forever. For more information, please visit www.frwa.org.

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November 8, 2010
Granby Land Trust Art Show Opening

Charles Wilhelm's November Sky, winner of Don and Marty Wilmot Award

Granby, CT – More than 100 people packed into the opening of the 5th annual Granby Land Trust juried art show, presented in partnership with Granby Artists Association, at J. Vallee Brunelle Fine Art & Framing in Granby Center on November 4th.

This year’s show, entitled, Our Scenic Valley: Celebrating its Beautiful Places, is different from past shows in that it embraces the beauty of not only Granby, but of the entire Farmington Valley. Artists from New York, Rhode Island, Massachusetts, and Connecticut submitted art inspired by such beautiful places as the Farmington River, the Metacomet Trail, Roaring Brook, and the Mary Edwards Mountain Property.

Juried by artist/educator Frank Federico, the show drew a record 143 pieces of original artwork (painted, drawn, photographed or 3-D), inspired by scenes that capture the beauty of the Farmington Valley. Seventy-two pieces were selected. Within days of the show’s opening, 15 pieces already had sold.

The winner of the show’s top prize – the Don and Marty Wilmot Award - was Charles Wilhelm for his watercolor titled November Sky. He was followed by Diane Christian, for her handmade wool felt piece titled, Path Near Trout Pond, which won the Land Trust Award; and Doug Tubach for his photograph, Fog on the Water, which won The Granby Community Fund Award.

Peter Dinella receiving the Stephen Brown Memorial Award

There were 13 additional prizes awarded as follows: Paul Batch won the Austin J. McNey Memorial Award given by Karen, Scott & Patrick McNey for Sunset Pines. Carole Day won the Granby Families for Art Award for Reflections at Paula & Whitey’s Place. Peter Dinella won the Stephen Brown Memorial Award for Misty Morning. Catherine Elliott won the Granby Artists Association Award for McLean Woods. The Ray Betts Award, given by Carol and Greg Reid, went to Mollie Megaffin for her pure silver pendant titled Falling Leaves – Oak. Kristen Cormier won the Tudor and Laura Holcomb Award, given by Nannie and Put Brown, for Morning Light. Deborah Leonard won the Matthew K. Orluk Award, given by Trish Percival and Rick Orluk, for September. Karen Suponski won the Mildred Dewey Award, given by Jenny and Dave Emery, for Parked on Main. Marilyn Swift won the Olof Stevenson Award, given by Jamie Gamble, for Johnson’s Red Barn. Lorraine Leroy won the Salmon Brook Watershed Association Award for Autumn Mars.; The William Stewart Award, given by Dave and Judy Russell, went to Tom Cameron for Yearning. And Elizabeth Rhoades won the Sandy and Dave Schupp Award for Brilliant Canopy.

This year’s prize money totaled $4,900, outstanding for a show of this size. Granby Land Trust President Rick Orluk says, “The support that our community, the Granby Artists Association, and each of the award donors gives to this show is truly remarkable. It is an abiding love of Granby that makes people want to support this show, and the Granby Land Trust is truly appreciative. The memorial awards, in particular, mean so much. Many of them honor people who loved Granby’s beautiful places. These artists are finding inspiration in the very things these people did: waterfalls, sunsets, falling leaves, misty mornings. It gives the show a whole other level of meaning.”

One artist remarked that she’s been to art shows across New England for 25 years and this one features an unparalleled energy level and a dynamic sense of community.

The event is presented by Fiduciary Investment Advisors, LLC and ALIRT Insurance Research LLC, with support from the Center Spirit Shop and Hayes-Huling Carmon Funeral Home.

The show will run through December 4th at J. Vallee Brunelle Fine Art and Framing in Granby (gallery hours are Tuesday through Friday, 10 AM – 5 PM, and Saturday 10 AM – 3 PM). “This is an opportunity to purchase beautiful, original art at a reasonable cost,” says Orluk. “And a portion of all art sales benefits the Land Trust. Paintings, sculptures, and photographs make wonderful gifts,” he added. “It’s an event not to be missed!”

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October 12, 2010
Granby Land Trust Presents
Our Scenic Valley: Preserving Its Beautiful Places
A Juried Art Show Opening Thursday, November 4th

GRANBY, CT – On Thursday, November 4th, the Granby Land Trust will host the show opening for its annual juried art show. The opening will take place from 5PM – 8PM at J. Vallee Brunelle Fine Art & Framing, 10 Hartford Avenue, in Granby Center. The theme of this year’s show is Our Scenic Valley: Preserving Its Beautiful Places. The art show’s fifteen awards, totaling nearly $5,000, will be announced and presented at this time. This special event is open to the public and all are invited to attend.

The Land Trust, in partnership with the Granby Artists Association, presents the Art Show through December 3rd. Juried by renowned Artist and Educator Frank Federico, the show features original artwork (painted, drawn, photographed or 3-D) that highlights the beauty of the Farmington Valley and the importance of preserving its natural heritage.

“The work of these artists reminds us how fortunate we are to live in the Farmington Valley and how important it is to preserve our natural heritage,” says Land Trust President Rick Orluk.

For more information about the show, visit www.GranbyLandTrust.org or call J. Vallee Brunelle Fine Art & Framing at 860.844.0277. The show’s presenting sponsors are Fiduciary Investment Advisors, LLC and ALIRT Insurance Research, with additional support from Hayes-Huling & Carmon Funeral Home and the Center Spirit Shop. Art Show award underwriters include the Land Trust, the Granby Community Fund, the Granby Artists Association, Don and Marty Wilmot, and many other families and individuals.

A portion of art sales from the show will benefit the Land Trust. An artist’s prospectus is available on the Granby Land Trust website.

Since its founding in 1972, the Granby Land Trust has worked to preserve Granby's Natural Heritage through the conservation of its scenic vistas, open space corridors, wildlife habitat, ecologically sensitive areas, and agricultural land. For more information about this or other upcoming Granby Land Trust events, please visit our website at www.GranbyLandTrust.org .

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October 12, 2010
Granby Land Trust Preserve Our Properties Day
To be held November 7th

GRANBY, CT – The Granby Land Trust’s Annual Preserve Our Properties Day will be held on Sunday, November 7, from 1 – 4 p.m. All are invited to help the Land Trust ready its properties for the coming winter. This is a great way to spend the day outdoors while contributing to a good cause.

Meeting Place: Volunteers will gather at 1:00 PM at the Land Trust’s Mary Edwards Mountain Property on Mountain Road in North Granby. Work parties will be formed and sent to various GLT properties.

What to Bring: Volunteers are asked to bring tools to help with property clean-up and trail clearing/maintenance efforts (rakes, saws, clippers, etc.) and dress for a day of outdoor work.
RSVP: Volunteers are asked to RSVP to Lowell or MaryEllen Kahn at 860.653.4911 or mekahn@cox.net.

Since its founding in 1972, the Granby Land Trust has worked to preserve Granby's Natural Heritage through the conservation of its scenic vistas, open space corridors, wildlife habitat, ecologically sensitive areas, and agricultural land. For more information about these upcoming Granby Land Trust events, visit www.GranbyLandTrust.org.

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October 12, 2010
Granby Land Trust Annual Meeting and Celebration
Scheduled for October 24th

GRANBY, CT – The Granby Land Trust’s Annual Meeting, Picnic and Walk will be held on Sunday, October 24, from 12 – 3 p.m. at Clark Farms at Bushy Hill Orchard. The event will begin with a casual, family-friendly potluck picnic and members’ gathering at 12 noon, followed by a brief annual meeting and the presentation of the Mary Edwards Friend of the Land Trust Award. It will be capped by a 45-minute walking tour of this beautiful orchard.

This event, which is open to all Granby Land Trust members, also will be a celebration of the successful preservation of the orchard.

Hamburgers, veggie-burgers and hotdogs will be provided. Guests are asked to bring a side salad, baked beans, or dessert to share. All events will be held outdoors, so guests should dress accordingly. All who would like to attend should RSVP to Jen Mooney at 413-9150 or jsmooney@cox.net. Nonmembers are welcome to join the Land Trust before the meeting (just $30 for a family membership) and bring the family for a day filled with fun and purpose.

The Land Trust – working with the State of Connecticut and the Town of Granby – led a successful effort to purchase the orchard’s development rights so that this historic orchard would remain a working agricultural enterprise. The purchase of these rights was completed earlier this year. Becky and Allen Clark then purchased the property and have reopened as Clark Farms at Bushy Hill Orchard.
Since its founding in 1972, the Granby Land Trust has worked to preserve Granby's Natural Heritage through the conservation of its scenic vistas, open space corridors, wildlife habitat, ecologically sensitive areas, and agricultural land. For more information about these upcoming Granby Land Trust events, visit www.GranbyLandTrust.org.

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May 13, 2010
Granby Oak Status Report: Truck Hits Branch

On May 11th, some type of truck hit one of the Dewey Granby Oak’s limbs that stretches majestically over Day Street (the truck did not stop). The Land Trust immediately called Brian Watkins – the arborist who has been regularly taking care of this grand old tree for the Land Trust – and asked him to inspect the tree, provide us with an update on damage and suggest a course of action/treatment.

Please know that the Land Trust views the Dewey Granby Oak as one of the town’s great assets and will do all that it can to maintain the health of this tree.

Below is Brian’s letter to the Land Trust:

May 12, 2010

Mr. Rick Orluk
President – Granby Land Trust
PO Box 23
Granby, CT 06035

Dear Rick,

As per your request, I have inspected the damage to the large limb of the Dewey Granby Oak that spreads over Day Street. The limb was struck by a tall box truck on the 11th of May, causing a large wound to its underside.

While the damage to the limb looks bad, it is my recommendation that it not be removed at this time. There are already two steel cables helping to support the limb so, from a structural standpoint at least, the limb isn’t about to break off. The wound may well be enough to cause the limb to die, but even if this is so, leaving it to decline naturally will allow the tree time to compartmentalize the decay and so limit the effect that the loss of such a large limb could have on the plant’s overall health.

If the limb were to be pruned off all at once, there is a good chance that the resulting shock to the root system could conceivably cause an irreversible decline in the entire tree.

For the time being, it is my opinion that the wound should be bark traced to promote callous growth, and fertilizer be applied through soil injection of the root zone to make micronutrients available to the tree.

A wait and see policy will ensure that every chance be given for the plant to recover from a fairly traumatic occurrence. As Aldo Leopold so famously wrote in A Sand County Almanac: “Trees don’t pay their bills from current earnings, they pay them from savings…” It will take some time before the full effect of this accident is fully realized. We can always prune the limb off at a later date, should it become necessary.

Regards,
R. Brian Watkins
Arborworks, Inc.

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March 23, 2010
FORCES OF NATURE to be Performed at the Holcomb Farm on May 1
by Shirley Murtha

The word "conservation" means something quite different to each of us, and that always has been the case. For some, it means leaving whatever is found in the natural world just as it is. Trees should grow to craggy old age and be replaced by new shoots that take their places when sufficient light comes to them. Fires should seen as part of the natural processes of nature, essential to creating openings for new growth, and the seeming anarchy of nature should be celebrated as creating a surpassing beauty that no work of man can imitate. Such an attitude sees nature as the highest form of poetry, subtle in its elegance and having something akin to a soul. John Muir, a Scotsman born in 1838, was of this view. Gifford Pinchot, 27 years younger than Muir and a native of Simsbury, saw things from a different perspective. He was a professional forester, the first Chief of the United States Forest Service, who was trained in the well manicured forests of Europe. He advocated the conservation of the nation's forest reserves by planned use and renewal. He called it "the art of producing from the forest whatever it can yield for the service of man."

These two perspectives, those of Muir and Pinchot, will be explored in a staged dramatic reading of "FORCES OF NATURE," a play in three acts, at the Holcomb Farm on May 1 at 7:00 PM. Written by Stephen Most and originally performed at the Bushnell Center for the Performing Arts in Hartford, FORCES OF NATURE will explore the personalities of these two men and their different views of what "conservation" should mean. Put Brown will play the role of Muir; Eric Lukingbeal the role of Pinchot; and Warren Markey the role of Theodore Roosevelt, who had the sometimes difficult task of finding common ground in their two perspectives and, in the process, creating public support for the creation and funding of so many of the National Parks that we now take almost for granted. Roosevelt, egged on by men such as Muir and Pinchot, but also by the public outcry their debates and oratory created, set aside more parks and wild lands than any other President has.

Stephen Most described his play as follows: "John Muir, Gifford Pinchot and Theodore Roosevelt continue to influence people more than a century since the peak of their careers. Their distinctive characters -- the idealistic naturalist, the innovative conservationist, the cowboy politician -- have inspired generations of Americans. This issues that brought them together and animated their vital conflict not only remain relevant to our era, they will in all likelihood shape the politics of the future in many countries around the world.

"In dramatizing their relationships, FORCES OF NATURE draws from documentary sources to a greater extent than plays usually do. Muir, Pinchot and Roosevelt express themselves eloquently in person and voluminously on the page -- via letters, journals, speeches and publications. As the biographies of each of these men will verify, every scene FORCES OF NATURE, except for one, is based on an encounter than actually occurred. This approach of inventing as little as possible while recreating the play's characters across the century that divides them from us will, I hope, have the paradoxical effect of making them our contemporaries. For their words and deeds reveal that the challenges they faced and their successes and defeats in meeting them are analogous to what confronts us today. They were definitely of their time, but in some respects, they were ahead of ours."

It is a fascinating story and the evening promises to be both educational and entertaining. We hope you’ll join the Land Trust on May 1 at 7 PM for Granby’s own Forces of Nature production.

Download a PDF filyer for the event.

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November 17, 2009
Land Trust Art Show Opening a Smashing Success!

Paul Batch's October Morning Winner of Don and Marty Wilmot Award

If you were in Granby Center on the night of Thursday, November 5th, you would have been hard pressed to find a parking spot.

Twinkling white lights, an overflow of people gathering under a welcoming awning, the happy sound of talking and laughing, wine glasses, splashes of color…this is what you would have seen. Was this New York City or Granby?

The weather held for the opening of “Preserving Granby One Square Foot at a Time”, the 4th annual juried art show presented by the Granby Land Trust in partnership with Granby Artists Association at J. Vallee Brunelle Fine Art & Framing in Granby Center. If you were one of the lucky to attend the opening that night, you would have viewed a top notch collection of art work from talented artists reaching from New York state to Rhode Island, Massachusetts and Connecticut and you would have witnessed the excitement that this special juried show generates. Some folks dressed up for this festive occasion, which is the highlight of a season of Land Trust events and behind the scenes efforts. In September, the Land Trust presented an artists’ paint-out, luncheon and talk with renowned PBS Art host David Dunlop on the spectacular Cormier Property.

Austin McNey Memorial Award Winner Avis Cherichetti with Karen McNey

Many of the works created that day hang in the gallery. Several pieces sold that night which is a tribute to the high quality of the show.

This year’s show, juried by East Granby artist Patricia Carrigan, features original artwork: painted, drawn, photographed or 3-D, inspired by a scene that captures the essence of Granby’s natural heritage. The format for works was uniquely “square” this year, and 2-D works had to be either 12” x 12” or 18” x 18” while 3-D work had to be presented on a square pedestal base. The show was intentionally staged on a smaller scale so that works from more artists could be featured and perhaps at more affordable price points.

The winner of the show’s top prize – the Don and Marty Wilmot Award - was Paul Batch of South Windsor for his oil painting titled October Morning. He was followed by the Granby Artists’ very own Sally Sargent Markey with her watercolor, Granby Oak, which won the Land Trust Award and William Simpson for his oil painting 41 degrees 57’ 24” N 72 degrees 47’ 28” W which won The Granby Community Fund Award. There were 12 additional prizes awarded as follows: Avis Cherichetti of Granby won the Austin J. McNey Memorial Award given by Karen, Scott & Patrick McNey for Opus II; Paul Goodnow won two awards – the Granby Families for Art Award and the Granby Artists Association Award – for Edge of the Pond and Early Autumn respectively; The Ray Betts Award given by Carol and Greg Reid went to Nina Ritson for her etching Willow at Hayes Farm; John Walker of Granby won the Tudor and Laura Holcomb Award given by Nannie and Put Brown for A.C. Petersen Barn; Cascading Bales by Laura Eden won the Matthew K. Orluk Award given by Trish Percival and Rick Orluk; Jane Zisk won the Mildred Dewey Award

Granby Community Fund Award Winner Bill Simpson with Dave Russell

given by Jenny and Dave Emery for Edge of the Field; Granby’s Maggie Burnett won the Olof Stevenson Award given by Jamie Gamble for Still Small Voice; Dick Sonderegger won the Salmon Brook Watershed Association Award for Enders Falls #6; The William Steward Award given by Dave and Judy Russell went to Virginia Peake for Cooling Off; Edward Mead won the Sandy and Dave Schupp Award for Good Morning Granby; and the Patricia Carrigan Juror’s Award went to Granby’s Carole Day for Hay Time at Old Peterson Farm. This year’s prize money totaled $4,800, which is outstanding for a show of this size, and is a tribute to our community which upholds the arts to the highest level. The event is presented by Fiduciary Investment Advisors, LLC with support from the Center Spirit Shop and Hayes-Huling Carmon Funeral Home.

Granby Land Trust President Rick Orluk is very proud of this year’s show, “Spread the word… stop in and see the show…it’s absolutely terrific and the variety of works is impressive. The artwork – all inspired by Granby scenes - is reasonably priced for holiday sale and a portion of all sales benefit the Land Trust. The support that our community, the Granby Artists Association and all the award donors give to this show is truly remarkable.”

The Land Trust Art Show runs from November 3rd through December 5th at J. Vallee Brunelle Fine Art and Framing (gallery hours are Tuesday through Friday, 10 AM – 5 PM, and Saturday 10 AM – 3 PM) and a portion of all arts sales benefit the Land Trust.

Download a PDF of the “Preserving Granby One Square Foot at a Time” art show program.

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October 29, 2009
Granby Oak Update provided by Arborworks

On behalf of the Granby Land Trust board, we are happy to report that the Granby Oak continues to reimain in "good health" for a tree "of its age" and we thank Brian Watkins and Arborworks for their generous help and support in monitoring the health of this beautiful tree. Please click here to see a letter providing a status report on the general health of the Granby Oak.

The Granby Land Trust would like to thank Brian Watkins - a Granby native - and his company, Arborworks, for their continued care of the Land Trust's Granby Oak. Brian has generously donated his time and service to care for and monitor the health of the Granby Oak over the last several years.

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October 28, 2009
Fred and Edith Wilhelm Receive GLT’s
2009 Mary Edwards Friend of the Land Trust Award

In honor of Mary Edwards’ many contributions to Granby and the Granby Land Trust, the Land Trust’s board of directors established the Mary Edwards Friend of the Trust Award in 2004. This service award – the Land Trust’s highest honor – is given annually to an individual or organization that has done – through a single gift or collectively over many years – the most to promote the GLT’s mission of “preserving Granby’s natural heritage.”

At the Land Trust’s annual meeting on October 25th, this year’s award was given to a very deserving couple, Fred and Edith Wilhelm.

The Granby Land Trust owes much of its early success and the resulting momentum that has brought it to its current status as one of Connecticut’s most vibrant land preservation organizations to Mary Edwards. Mary recognized the Land Trust’s potential and nurtured it with important early gifts and, eventually, the gift of one of the Land Trust’s signature properties, the Mary Edwards Preserve on Mountain Road in North Granby.

Mary was not a set-it-aside-and-do-nothing-with-it preservationist. She sought balance and encouraged others to embrace that attitude. Thus, she gave some land to protect delicate wildlife habitat and other parcels to assure views, to provide hiking paths and to allow other sorts of public uses.

Each year, the Land Trust celebrates another of its other supporters who has embraced the values that Mary encouraged. This year, we are especially proud to honor Fred and Edie Wilhelm. They knew Mary, worked with her and other early supporters of the Land Trust and, by their own gifts and encouragement of others, did as much over the years as any couple did to assure the success of the Land Trust. Most especially, they urged balance. Some land should be preserved for wildlife and left alone. Other parcels should be preserved by outright gifts or the grants of conservation easements for agricultural uses. They did that by granting a conservation easement on their own land in North Granby. That property is now stewarded by their daughter Ann and her husband, Bill Bentley, who maintain a much-loved farm on the property. They also have encouraged others of their generation to preserve land for agricultural uses or for hiking or other passive recreation uses. Without their active encouragement, other important gifts may never have been made.

Balance, generosity of spirit, long-term perspective and boundless energy are their hallmarks, as they were Mary’s, so it is only fitting that we honor Fred and Edie with the Land Trust’s highest award. We know that Mary would be delighted to know that her good friends have maintained their loyalty to the Land Trust and have received this honor in her name.

We are so thankful for all Fred and Edie have done for the Land Trust and, in so many other ways, for the Town of Granby. With supporters such as these, the future looks bright as the Land works to preserve our Town’s natural heritage.

The Granby Land Trust salutes Fred and Edith Wilhlem for all they have done and is proud to give them the 2009 Mary Edwards Friend of the Land Trust Award.

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October 18, 2009
Granby Land Trust Presents Preserving Granby One Square Foot At A Time
A Juried Art Show Opening Thursday, November 5th

GRANBY, CT – On Thursday, November 5th, the Granby Land Trust will host the show opening for Preserving Granby One Square Foot At A Time, a Juried Art Show, from 5PM – 8PM at J. Vallee Brunelle Fine Art & Framing, 10 Hartford Avenue, in Granby Center. The art show’s fifteen awards will be announced and presented at this time. This special event is open to the public and all are invited to attend.

The Land Trust – in partnership with the Granby Artists Association – is presenting the Art Show which will remain open to the public through December 3rd at J. Vallee Brunelle Fine Art & Framing. Juried by Patricia Carrigan, the show features original artwork (painted, drawn, photographed or 3-D) inspired by a scene that captures the essence of Granby’s natural heritage. This year, all artwork is required to be small, square works, measuring 12” by 12” or 18” by 18”. A portion of art sales from the show will benefit the Land Trust.

“This show highlights the natural surroundings that elevate our quality of life on a daily basis.” said Land Trust President Rick Orluk. “The work of these artists reminds us how fortunate we are to live in Granby and how important it is to preserve our natural heritage. Granby is lucky to have beautiful, natural places like the various Land Trust properties, Holcomb Farm, the Salmon Brook, orchards like Bushy Hill and Lost Acres, the Wilhelm and Hayes Farms, and the McLean Game Refuge. We hope folks will join us for the opening on Thursday, November 5th and make time to visit the show during the month of November.”

For more information about the show, visit www.GranbyLandTrust.org or call J. Vallee Brunelle Fine Art & Framing at 860.844.0277. Show supporters include: Fiduciary Investment Advisors, LLC; Hayes-Huling & Carmon Funeral Home and the Center Spirit Shop. Art Show award underwriters include the Land Trust, the Granby Community Fund, the Granby Artists Association, the Salmon Brook Watershed Association, Don and Marty Wilmot, and many other families and individuals.

Since its founding in 1972, the Granby Land Trust has worked to preserve Granby's Natural Heritage through the conservation of its scenic vistas, open space corridors, wildlife habitat, ecologically sensitive areas, and agricultural land. For more information about this or other upcoming Granby Land Trust events, please visit our website at www.GranbyLandTrust.org .

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August 5, 2009
Join the Granby Land Trust and the Granby Artists Association for their Annual Granby’s Natural Landscape Plein Air Painting Event on September 13th

Renowned landscape artist and PBS Show Host David Dunlop to Present

Beginning at 12:00 noon on Sunday, September 13th, the Granby Land Trust and the Granby Artists Association invite the community to join them at the spectacular Cormier Property on Silkey Road in West Granby for their annual Granby’s Natural Landscape Plein Air Painting Event.  David Dunlop – artist, educator and host of PBS’ nationally-acclaimed "Landscapes Through Time" series – will give a lunchtime talk about painting the natural landscape, followed by a painting demonstration. Following Mr. Dunlop’s demo and talk, attendees will have the opportunity to talk with him, tour the Cormier and adjacent Schupp Properties and see area artists working plein air, preparing artwork which may be included in the upcoming art show – Preserving Granby One Square Foot at a Time. The event will run until approximately 3 PM. The rain date is Sunday, September 20th. 

“We are very fortunate to have David Dunlop in Granby on September 13th to kick-off activities leading up to the Land Trust’s Art Show in November,” said Land Trust President Rick Orluk.  “Mr. Dunlop is a dynamic presenter with a national following – I highly encourage citizens and artists alike to join us for this special event.”

The Cormier Property, located at 12 Silkey Road in West Granby, is privately owned by Land Trust members Kristen and Ted Cormier. This 25-acre property features hills, open meadows, a pond, and stream, and is one of Granby’s truly beautiful places.  Adjacent to the Cormier property is the 120-acre Schupp property, which features a beautiful gambrel-roofed barn and acres of open fields. The Schupp property was part of the A.C. Petersen Dairy Farm before the Schupps purchased the land 20 years ago.

The Granby Land Trust’s Art Show theme for this year – Preserving Granby One Square Foot at a Time – seeks to highlight the importance of preserving Granby’s natural heritage, ranging from the stunning views offered by the Land Trust’s Mary Edwards Mountain Property to the beautiful places on privately owned-parcels such as the Cormier and Schupps, that are preserved by gifts of conservation easements to the Land Trust.

On Sunday, September 27th, a Children’s Paint-Out will be held from 1-3 pm at the Schupps at 64 Higley Road in West Granby. Young artists are invited to work plein air with the assistance of members of the Granby Artists Association.  Children may bring their own materials or use and there will be watercolor, pastels and paper on hand.  There is no rain date at this time for this event.   For more information about the Children’s Paint-Out, contact Kristen Cormier at 860.653.5390 or by email at tpcnksc@cox.net.

Beginning on November 5th and running through December 3rd, the Granby Land Trust, in partnership with the Granby Artists Association, will present a juried art show - Preserving Granby One Square Foot at a Time - at J. Vallee Brunelle Fine Art and Framing, 10 Hartford Avenue, Granby. It will feature original smaller scale works in a square format:  painted, drawn, photographed or 3-D, inspired by a Granby scene that captures the essence of Granby’s natural heritage. Artist Patricia Carrigan will jury the show which features awards totaling more than $4000. An opening reception and award presentation is scheduled for Thursday, November 5th, from 5 to 8 PM at J. Vallee Brunelle Fine Art & Framing. The public is invited to attend both the opening and the month-long art show. A portion of art sales from the show will benefit the Granby Land Trust. This is the fourth annual art show hosted by the Granby Land Trust. Last year’s show, Granby’s Natural Waterscapes, featured work inspired by waterways across town and drew more than 100 entries from across New England.

For more detailed information about the September 13th event at the Cormier Property, RSVP to the event or order an event lunch made by Lost Acres Orchard, please call Rick Orluk at 860.653.7095.  Artists who are interested in learning more about or participating in the Granby’s Natural Landscape paint-out on Sunday, September 13th and/or the Juried Art Show in November can visit www.GranbyLandTrust.org or contact Kristen Cormier at tpcnksc@cox.net or phone 860.653. 5390. 

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August 5, 2009
The Land Trust Mourns the Death of Seth Holcombe

Seth Pomeroy Holcombe, one of the Land Trust's most generous benefactors, died at age 91 on July 9, 2009. A brilliant conversationalist, he had -- and was always anxious to share -- strong and thoughtfully articulated opinions on politics, history, the economy, religion, grammar, the environment, the Red Sox and a host of other topics that intrigued him. He wasn't just a talker, though. He worked tirelessly for the organizations he supported. Among the other public and charitable roles he played, he was a founder of the Granby Horse Council, a member of the Board of Directors of The Salmon Brook Historical Society, a member of the Granby Zoning Board of Appeals and a member of the Granby Republican Town Committee. He also served as Secretary and Registrar of the Morgan Horse Club (now the American Morgan Horse Association) and President of the New England Morgan Horse Association.

Famously frugal with his personal expenditures, he was quietly generous in his support of the charities he cared about. He and his wife Lucy donated a conservation easement on their farm on Silver Street to the Land Trust and, in 2005, received the Land Trust's highest honor, the Mary Edwards Friend of the Land Trust Award. As the citation presented to both of them at that time said, Seth and Lucy "share a reverence for the heritage of Granby. They have been active in the Salmon Brook Historical Society, which works to preserve Granby's cultural heritage. But that heritage is intimately connected to people's relationships with the land, so it is not surprising that they would also be active in the affairs of the Land Trust, which works to preserve Granby's natural heritage. These are two sides of the same coin, the common elements being place and heritage."

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May 9-10, 2009
Granby Land Trust Bird Walk Sightings

Held on Jamie Gamble’s beautiful North Granby property off of Loomis Street, the two Land Trust Bird Walks on May 9 & 10 - led by John Weeks and Christine Chinni – yielded a broad range of bird sightings, with more than forty species seen each morning.  On Saturday morning, two Virginia Rails came out and put on a show, and a Blue-winged Warbler buzzed the group several times (in response to the bird recording) to put the finishing touch on Sunday's walk. 

Listed below are the birds seen each day.  The Land Trust wishes to thank John Weeks and Christine for leading these walks and also extends a special thanks to Jamie Gamble who hosted the events.

SPECIES

MAY 9

MAY 10

1.

Great Blue Heron

X

2.

Canada Goose

X

X

3.

Wood Duck

X

X

4.

Mallard

X

X

5.

Virginia Rail

X

X

6.

Mourning Dove

X

X

7.

Belted Kingfisher

X

8.

Red-bellied Woodpecker

X

X

9.

Yellow-bellied Sapsucker

X

10.

Downy Woodpecker

X

11.

Pileated Woodpecker

X

12.

Great Crested Flycatcher

X

13.

Eastern Kingbird

 

X

14.

Warbling Vireo

X

15.

Red-eyed Vireo

X

16.

Blue Jay

X

X

17.

American Crow

X

X

18.

Tree Swallow

X

19.

Barn Swallow

X

20.

Black-capped Chickadee

X

X

21.

Tufted Titmouse

X

X

22.

White-breasted Nuthatch

X

23.

House Wren

X

X

24.

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher

X

X

25.

Veery

X

26.

Wood Thrush

X

X

27.

American Robin

X

X

28.

Gray Catbird

X

X

29.

Blue-winged Warbler

X

X

30.

Nashville Warbler

X

31.

Yellow Warbler

X

X

32.

Chestnut-sided Warbler

X

X

33.

Magnolia Warbler

X

34.

Black-throated Blue Warbler

X

X

35.

Yellow-rumped Warbler

X

36.

Black-throated Green Warbler

X

37.

Black-and-white Warbler

X

X

38.

American Redstart

X

X

39.

Ovenbird

X

X

40.

Louisiana Waterthrush

X

X

41.

Common Yellowthroat

X

X

42.

Scarlet Tanager

X

X

43.

Eastern Towhee

X

X

44.

Song Sparrow

X

X

45.

Swamp Sparrow

X

X

46.

Northern Cardinal

X

X

47.

Rose-breasted Grosbeak

X

X

48.

Red-winged Blackbird

X

X

49.

Brown-headed Cowbird

X

X

50.

Baltimore Oriole

X

X

51.

American Goldfinch

X

X

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March 16, 2009
Granby Land Trust Announces Spring Event Schedule

Tails to Trails on April 4, Family Hike on April 19 and Preserve Our Properties on April 26

GRANBY, CT – On Saturday, April 4th, the Land Trust is offering its first Tails to Trails Hike (bring your dog with you and they’ll enjoy the company of their canine friends!) on the beautiful Johnson Property in West Granby.  Led by Land Trust board member Paula Johnson, you and your dog are invited for a walk on this spectacular property which is now preserved through the generous donation of a conservation easement to the Land Trust by Paula and Whitey Johnson.  This walk will start at 11 a.m. from Paula and Whitey Johnson’s home at 289 Simsbury Road in West Granby.  All dogs must be on a leash.  Please dress warmly and wear hiking shoes as you will be walking in the woods.  For more info about this hike or to RSVP, please contact Paula Johnson by emailing her at phj38@cox.net or by phone at 860.653.3132.

On Sunday, April 19th, you and your family are invited to join the Land Trust for a Family Hike led by Dave Emery and Dave Schupp on the spectacular Schupp Property (generously preserved as open space forever through the Schupps’ donation of a conservation easement on this property) in West Granby. We'll explore all that the New England spring has to offer, ranging from vernal pools (lots of amphibian activity for the younger members of the hike!) to some beautiful backwoods waterways (great for rock throwing!). In between, you'll learn more about the great outdoors, enjoy the company of friends and bask in the peace of the West Granby woods (interrupted, of course, by the shrieks of younger family members discovering nature's treasures). This family hike will begin at 1 p.m. and the pace will be such that all members of the family - younger and older - can enjoy a day in the woods. All attendees are encouraged to wear waterproof hiking shoes as it can be muddy in the woods this time of year.  Please RSVP to Dave Emery at 860.653.3746 or DWE79@aol.com.

On Sunday, April 26th, please join the Land Trust for its annual Spring Preserve Our Properties Day and help ready its properties for spring. This event will start at 1 p.m. -- all volunteers should meet at the Land Trust’s Mary Edwards Mountain Property on Mountain Road in North Granby (work parties will be put together from there and sent to various Land Trust properties). Bring your rakes, clippers and outdoor tools. This is a great way to help maintain Land Trust properties while spending the day outdoors meeting fellow Land Trust members.  To RSVP or for more info about this event, contact Land Trust Board Member Lowell Kahn at 860.653.4911 or by email at mekahn@cox.net.

On May 9 and 10, the Land Trust will once again host two Spring Bird Walks led by Land Trust members John Weeks and Christine Chinni. These walks will start promptly at 7:00AM. You'll see lots of birds at this time of year as they return from a winter away (John will get them close by calling them in with his MP3 player - join us and see what we mean, you'll be amazed!) You don't have to be a birder to enjoy this quiet morning in the woods. Space is limited, so reserve your spot early – these walks have become very popular.  Location of walks will be announced shortly on Land Trust website. To reserve your space or get more info, call John Weeks at 860.844.8965 or contact him by email at aerie.john@cox.net.

All of these events are free and open to Land Trust members as well as the general public (hopefully, once attending, you’ll choose to join the Land Trust).

Since its founding in 1972, the Granby Land Trust has worked to preserve Granby's Natural Heritage through the conservation of its scenic vistas, open space corridors, wildlife habitat, ecologically sensitive areas, and agricultural land.  For more information about the Land Trust or for the most updated list of upcoming events, please visit www.GranbyLandTrust.org.

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January 19, 2009
The Land Trust Mourns the Death of Two Good Friends
And Celebrates Their Lives and Legacy

Mildred Dewey passed away in July 2006 and her husband Herbert died just recently, on January 8, 2009, a day after his 88th birthday. She was proudly a Humphrey and he was a scion of another of Granby’s well-known farming families. The Dewey Granby Oak stands as a reminder of his family’s role in the agricultural history of the town and their land on Loomis Street, inherited from her Humphrey forebears and generously donated to the Land Trust, will be both a monument to that family’s past and a property that will forever be available for agricultural uses. Both properties, the Dewey Granby Oak and the Loomis Street property, are owned by the Granby Land Trust. They are important parts of the town’s natural heritage, as well as its cultural heritage.

In donating their Loomis Street property to the Land Trust, the Deweys reserved lifetime rights for themselves and for their dear friends, Michelle and Scott Holcomb, but expressed the hope that the tillable portion of the land, which is most of it, will forever be farmed. They realized that it is one thing for the Land Trust and others to say that the community supports the preservation of local farms, but that goal can’t be achieved if the best land is used for residential and commercial developments. Some fields have to be set aside for agricultural uses. They were willing – anxious, in fact – to do that with their own land and so, with their passing, the Land Trust has assumed the responsibility of seeing to it that their vision is realized.

The Land Trust pledges to be good stewards and, in the process, to celebrate the many years Herb, Mildred and their families before them farmed that land and were important figures in the social and cultural life of the community. Granby was their home; they knew the local landscape and its people with an intimacy that few of us growing up in an increasingly mobile society can understand; and the simplicity of their way of life will long inspire others of us who look for the peace of mind they felt.

The people of Granby are fortunate to have inherited their land. That is just what has happened, because what the Land Trust owns is, in practical effect, the common property of all of us. The Land Trust thanks Mildred and Herbert Dewey for their generosity, vision and commitment to Granby.

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November 17, 2008
Granby Land Trust’s Granby’s Natural Waterscapes
Juried Art Show Award Winners Announced

Granby Artist Rosemarie Mendes (left) accepts the Austin J. McNey Memorial Award from Karen McNey, who, with her sons Scott and Patrick, gave the award in memory of her husband and their father, Austin McNey, a lifelong Granby resident who loved the outdoors. Ms. Mendes won the award for her oil painting, "Rushing Water."

GRANBY, CT – On Thursday, November 6th, the Granby Land Trust’s Granby’s Natural Waterscapes Juried Art Show opened at J. Vallee Brunelle Fine Art & Framing in Granby Center.  With a full house featuring many of the participating artists and a large crowd of art enthusiasts, the juried art show’s 52 awards were presented.  Luciana Heineman of Avon, Granby High School Graduate Chris Magoon, and Stephen Calcasola won the top three show awards – The Don and Marty Wilmot Award, The Granby Land Trust Award and The Granby Community Fund Award.  More than 115 pieces of original artwork were entered in the show (52 were selected by the juror for inclusion) by artists from Connecticut, Massachusetts, and Rhode Island.

Juried by Walter Hall, a professor of ceramics at the Hartford Art School, the show featured original artwork (painted, drawn, photographed or 3D) of Granby’s most picturesque water scenes.  

Award winners were as follows:  Don & Marty Wilmot Award – Luciana Heineman, Brook at Trout Pond; Granby Land Trust Award – Chris Magoon, Salmon and Brook Trout; Granby Community Fund Award – Stephen Calcasola, Inner Stream; Austin J. McNey Memorial Award – Rosemarie Mendes, Rushing Water; Granby Families for Art Award I – Virginia Peake, The Watering Hole; Granby Families for Art Award II – Nancy Tongue Howe, From Bridge on Mechanicsville Road; Granby Artists Association Award – John C. Walker, Woodland Pond in Winter; Salmon Brook Watershed Award – William Simpson, Brookie; Ray Betts Award – Kevin Calcasola, Enders’ Falls; Mildred Dewey Award – Barbara J. Alex, Secluded Stream; Olof Stevenson Award – Joan Jardine, Marsh #1; Tudor & Laura Holcomb Award – Gwynne Everitt, Help! The Waters Rising; Matthew K. Orluk Award – Edward Mead, Mill Pond; Judy & Dave Russell Award – Laura Eden, Summer’s Ending Triumph; Sandy & Dave Schupp Award – Sally Sargent Markey, Inspired by Enders’ Falls; Walter Hall Juror’s Award – Nina Ritson, Brook in Granby.

Show awards totaling nearly $5,000 were underwritten by:  Marty and Don Wilmot; the Granby Land Trust; the Granby Community Fund; Karen, Scott and Patrick McNey; Granby Families for Art; the Granby Artists Association; the Salmon Brook Watershed Association; Jenny and Dave Emery, Jamie Gamble; Nannie and Put Brown; Trish Percival and Rick Orluk; Judy and Dave Russell; Sandy and Dave Schupp; and Walter Hall. 

The Art Show’s presenting sponsor was Fiduciary Investment Advisors and show supporters included Center Spirit Shop, Dragonfly Events, Hayes-Huling & Carmon Funeral Home, J. Vallee Brunelle Fine Art & Framing, and Ovoo Creative.

Since its founding in 1972, the Granby Land Trust has worked to preserve Granby's Natural Heritage through the conservation of its scenic vistas, open space corridors, wildlife habitat, ecologically sensitive areas, and agricultural land.  For more information about this or other upcoming Granby Land Trust events, visit www.GranbyLandTrust.org.

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October 20, 2008
Granby Land Trust Presents
Granby’s Natural Waterscapes Juried Art Show:
Art Show Opens Thursday, November 6th – Public Invited to Attend

GRANBY, CT – On Thursday, November 6th, the Granby Land Trust is hosting the show opening for its Celebrating Granby’s Natural Waterscapes Juried Art Show from 5PM – 8PM at J. Vallee Brunelle Fine Art & Framing, 10 Hartford Avenue, in Granby Center. The art show’s fifteen awards will be announced and presented at this time. This special event is open to the public and all are invited to attend. 

The Land Trust – in partnership with the Granby Artists Association – will then present the Granby’s Natural Waterscapes Juried Art Show through November 28th at J. Vallee Brunelle Fine Art & Framing. Juried by Walter Hall, this show features original artwork (painted, drawn, photographed or 3-D) inspired by a Granby water scene. A portion of art sales from the show will benefit the Land Trust. 

“This special art show highlights the ecological and historical importance of Granby’s waterways to our community,” said Land Trust President Rick Orluk. “The artists and their work encourage us to recognize how fortunate we are to live in Granby and how important it is for us to preserve these beautiful and fragile waterways, such as the Salmon Brook, which wends through our town; Ring Brook, on the Land Trust’s Mary Edwards Mountain Property; and Trout Pond, in McLean Game Refuge.  We hope folks will join us for the opening on Thursday, November 6th and make time to visit the show during the month of November.”

For more information about the show, visit www.GranbyLandTrust.org or call J. Vallee Brunelle Fine Art & Framing at 860.844.0277. Show supporters include:  Fiduciary Investment Advisors, LLC; Hayes-Huling & Carmon Funeral Home and the Center Spirit Shop. Art Show award underwriters include the Land Trust, the Granby Community Fund, the Granby Artists Association, the Salmon Brook Watershed Association, Don and Marty Wilmot and many other families and individuals.

Since its founding in 1972, the Granby Land Trust has worked to preserve Granby's Natural Heritage through the conservation of its scenic vistas, open space corridors, wildlife habitat, ecologically sensitive areas, and agricultural land. For more information about this or other upcoming Granby Land Trust events, please visit our website at www.GranbyLandTrust.org.

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August 17, 2008
Celebrating Granby's Natural Waterscapes
The Granby Land Trust and the Granby Artists Association Present a Talk, Property Tour, & Plein Air Painting Demonstrations on the beautiful Gamble Property in North Granby

by Rick Orluk

Beginning at 12:00 noon on Sunday, September 14th, the Granby Land Trust and the Granby Artists Association invite the community to join them at the spectacular Gamble Property on Loomis Street in North Granby for a lunchtime talk about Granby’s waterways and the art they inspire. Following the lunch and talk, attendees will have the opportunity to tour the Gamble Property and see area artists working plein air, preparing artwork which may be included in the upcoming art show – Granby’s Natural Waterscapes. A lunch will be available for purchase – it must be pre-ordered by visiting the Land Trust website at www.GranbyLandTrust.org or by calling Rick Orluk at 653-7095. The artists may begin painting at 9:00 AM. The event will run until 3 PM. The rain date is Sunday, September 21st.

The spectacular Gamble Property at 253 Loomis Street in North Granby is privately owned by Land Trust board member Jamie Gamble. This approximately 200-acre property features a pond and stream and is one of Granby’s truly beautiful places.

The Granby Land Trust’s Art Show theme for this year – Granby’s Natural Waterscapes – seeks to highlight the importance of Granby’s waterways in our community and the importance of preserving the ecological life supported by these beautiful places, ranging from the Salmon Brook to Ring Brook on the Land Trust’s Mary Edwards Mountain Property to Trout Pond in the McLean Game Refuge.

On Sunday, September 28th, a second paint-out for artists will be held in the Trout Pond area at McLean Game Refuge. Artists will be working plein air beginning at 9AM. Parking for Trout Pond is off of Rt. 10 in Granby. Artists looking for more information about this second paint out can contact Laura Eden at 860.653.6274 or by email at laura@laurajeden.com. The public is welcome.

Beginning on November 6th and running through November 28th, the Granby Land Trust, in partnership with the Granby Artists Association, will present a juried Granby’s Natural Waterscapes Art Show. The event will be held at J. Vallee Brunelle Fine Art and Framing, 10 Hartford Avenue, Granby. It will feature original artwork, painted, drawn, photographed or 3-D, inspired by a Granby water scene. Professor Walter Hall will jury the show for entry and for prizes totaling more than $3500. An opening reception and award presentation is scheduled for Thursday, November 6th, from 5 to 8 PM. The public is invited to attend both the opening and the month-long art show. A portion of art sales from the show will benefit the Granby Land Trust.

This is the third annual art show hosted by the Granby Land Trust. Last year’s show, titled Granby’s Farms & Orchards, which featured work from agricultural scenes across town, drew more than 100 entries from across New England and was deemed a success by artists, critics, and collectors alike.

For more detailed information about the September 14th event at the Gamble Property and the November Granby’s Natural Waterscapes Art Show, please, visit the Land Trust web site at www.GranbyLandTrust.org or call Rick Orluk at 860.653.7095.

Artists who are interested in participating in either of the Granby’s Natural Waterscapes paint-outs -- on Sunday, September 14 or Sunday, September 28 -- and/or the juried art show in November can also find more information, a list of suggested Granby water scenes and an art show prospectus at www.GranbyLandTrust.org, or contact Rosemarie Mendes at ramusic@cox.net or phone 860.653.0566.

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Legislative Victory for Land Conservation
Congress Passes Conservation Tax Incentive for Family Farms and Ranches

May 23, 2008

WASHINGTON, D.C. — The hotly debated Farm Bill, which Congress enacted yesterday with an override of the President’s veto, renews a powerful tax incentive which has helped conserve a million or more acres of farms, ranches and natural areas across the US. The incentive had expired January 1st, but is now retroactive to the beginning of the year and will last through 2009.

A broad coalition representing sportsmen, outdoors enthusiasts, farmers, ranchers and national conservation groups, embraced the measure. Rand Wentworth, president of the Land Trust Alliance, said “This renewed tax incentive for donations of conservation easements is one of the best things Congress could do this year to help landowners choose the conservation option over sprawl. Especially for family farmers and ranchers of modest income, this is a great way to help them keep productive agricultural land from being lost.”

Wentworth gave special credit to Senators Max Baucus (D-MT) and Charles Grassley (R-IA) and Representatives Mike Thompson (D-CA) and Dave Camp (R-MI), saying “They are all true conservation leaders who have worked tirelessly to save a conservation measure that has already had benefits in hundreds of communities across the country.” In conserving land, Wentworth added, “We also are protecting clean air, clean water, wildlife habitat, local food sources, historic landscapes and scenic beauty.”

Senator Baucus, who originated the incentive provision, said “Simply put—this is an incentive that works: for conservation, for farmers, for ranchers, and for all landowners who want a fair deal for their tremendous generosity in donating conservation easements. Many ranchers and other landowners in Montana and across the US have told me they could not afford to conserve their land without this measure.”

The incentive, which applies to a landowner’s federal income tax, will:

  • Raise the deduction a donor can take for donating a voluntary conservation agreement from 30% of their income in any year to 50%;
  • Allow farmers and ranchers to deduct up to 100% of their income; and
  • Increase the number of years over which a donor can take deductions from 6 to 16 years.

Landowner donations to conservation organizations known as land trusts have resulted in millions of acres of working lands and natural areas being conserved for the future. According to the Alliance, many conservation groups reported an annual doubling of the number of conservation agreements completed in 2007, in response to the same incentive that had expired in January. Land trusts in America have together saved more than 36 million acres from development, an area the size of New England.

The Alliance also credited the success of the measure to the entrepreneurial spirit of the private sector, which has taken the lead in conserving land in recent years. Said Wentworth, “The fact is that conservation in this country now depends greatly on the generosity of individuals. It is the individual rancher, farmer or forester, working the land in a way that is conservation-oriented, who will largely define our natural heritage in the future.’

Lead Organizations Supporting the Conservation Tax Incentive

American Bird Conservancy
American Farm Bureau Foundation
American Farmland Trust
American Fisheries Society
American Sportfishing Association
Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies
BASS/ESPN Outdoors
Boone and Crockett Club
Campfire Club of America
Civil War Preservation Trust
The Congressional Sportsmen's Foundation
Conservation Force
The Conservation Fund
Delta Waterfowl Foundation
Ducks Unlimited
Environmental Defense
Foundation for North American Wild Sheep
Izaak Walton League of America
Mule Deer Foundation
National Audubon Society
National Cattleman's Beef Association
National Shooting Sports Foundation
National Wild Turkey Foundation
The Nature Conservancy
North American Grouse Partnership
Partnership of Rangeland Trusts
Pheasants Forever
Piedmont Environmental Council
Quail Unlimited
Quality Deer Management Association
Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation
Safari Club International
Scenic America
Theodore Roosevelt Conservation Partnership
Trout Unlimited
The Trust for Public Land
The Vital Ground Foundation
Wildlife Management Institute
The Wildlife Society

This list does not include hundreds of state and local land trusts (including the Granby Land Trust) who were also instrumental in passage of the incentive.

The Land Trust Alliance is a national conservation group that works to save the places people love by strengthening conservation throughout America.

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Harry and Susan Werner Preserve a Wildlife Corridor

March 3, 2008

The Land Trust is excited to announce that Harry and Susan Werner have generously donated a conservation easement over 39 acres of their land at the end of Godard Road in North Granby. The protected property – highly developable former pastures and agricultural land now reverted to woods -- includes land that has both ecological and historic significance.

It is home to a rich variety of native fauna, including mink, deer, river otter, black bear, raccoon, turkey, brook trout, bobcat, opossum, pileated woodpecker, and a host of songbirds. It also is home to some stunning native flora, including the second largest known sassafras tree in Connecticut, as well as extensive stands of old growth hardwood and deciduous trees.

Just to the west, separated by a thin sliver of privately-owned, un-developable land, lies the Granby Land Trust’s Godard Preserve, a 113-acre parcel that was donated to the Land Trust by the Godard family in 1997. Together, these two properties play key roles in creating a significant wildlife corridor which connects to the Land Trust’s Mary Edwards Mountain Property and adjoining protected state lands.

The property has historic significance as well, as it wraps around the Werners’ house, which is the former Cossitt family homestead. The Cossitt family burial ground also is situated on the property and contains graves dating back to the 18th Century. Brothers Roger and Jesse Cossitt are buried here, having been killed in the 1776 battle of New York. Thanks to the Werner family, these historical sites will be preserved for future generations.

If you know the Werners, please thank them for their generosity, vision and commitment to Granby. The Land Trust salutes the Werners for partnering with the Land Trust to permanently preserve Granby’s natural heritage.

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Put and Nannie Brown Donate Another Conservation Easement to Land Trust

November 27, 2007

As they generously did last year, Put and Nannie Brown have donated another conservation easement on a portion of their land, this time on a 10.3 acre parcel on the south side of Broad Hill Road. The land, which has enough frontage to have permitted the creation of at least three building lots, is across the street from the "Diamond Ledges Preserve" donated to the Land Trust by Mary Edwards and abuts the Town-owned Holcomb Farm. Those properties, in turn, are part of a much larger assemblage of permanently protected land (Enders State Forest, the Land Trust's Dimock and Peterson Preserves and other properties) which aggregates almost 8,000 acres, or 12.5 square miles. The Brown land is the last privately owned developable land on either side of Broad Hill Road for over a mile and a half. As she signed the deed, Nannie said that, "We are grateful that we have had our time as stewards of this beautiful piece of property that abuts acres and acres of preserved forest and   streams. Now, we can be confident that it will be protected and managed for future generations of this community by the Granby Land Trust. It is a happy day for us and for this land!"

She is right. The preservation of our rapidly disappearing natural areas requires a partnership between donors, on the one hand, and stewards such as the Land Trust who are willing to take on the responsibility, and have the personnel and resources, to carry out the donors' wishes, on the other hand.

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Granby Land Trust’s Celebrating Granby’s Farms & Orchards Juried Art Show Award Winners Announced

November 11, 2007

GRANBY, CT – On Thursday, November 1st, the Granby Land Trust’s Celebrating Granby’s Farms & Orchards Juried Art Show opened at J. Vallee Brunelle Fine Art & Framing in Granby Center.  With a full house on hand featuring many of the participating artists and a large crowd of art enthusiasts, the juried art show’s thirteen awards were presented.  Granby’s Bill Simpson, Carla Niehaus of Barkhamsted, Connecticut and Linda Tenukas of Berlin, Connecticut won the top three show awards – The Don and Marty Wilmot Award, The Granby Land Trust Award and The Granby Community Fund Award.  More than 100 pieces of original artwork were entered in the show (52 were selected by the juror for inclusion in the show) by artists from Rhode Island, Connecticut and Massachusetts.

Bill Simpson's painting entitled "Shadows" of the barn on Kelly Lane was the winner of the Don and Marty Wilmot Award.

Juried by Paul Zelanski - distinguished Professor Emeritus of the University of  Connecticut School of Fine Art, the show features original artwork (painted, drawn, photographed or 3D) inspired by a Granby farm, orchard or agricultural scene.   Award winners were as follows:  The Don and Marty Wilmot Award – Bill Simpson/Shadows;  The Granby Land Trust Award – Carla Niehaus/Fence Row; The Granby Community Fund Award – Linda Tenukas/Fallow Fields; The Ray Betts Award – Kristen Cormier/Old Truck; The Nannie and Put Brown Award given anonymously to recognize the Brown’s commitment to preserving Granby’s Natural Heritage – Paul Goodnow/Birches at Holcomb Farm; The Mildred Dewey Award – Nathaniel Gould/Tree Line – Wilhelm Farm; The Tudor and Laura Holcomb Award – Andrea Marschalk/Garlic Farm Root Cellar; The Matthew K. Orluk Award – Andres Montiel/Peach Trees; The Olof Stevenson Award – Jane Zisk/Granby Afternoon; The Paul Zelanski Award – Edward Mead/And Still Growing; The Cormier Family Award – Alex Vranos/Look At Me – Day Street; The Dave and Judy Russell Award – Michael Patnode/”Say Cheese”; and, The Granby Artists Association Award – Jana Volpe/Red Barn in Early Spring.

Show awards totaling $3,500 were underwritten by:  Don and Marty Wilmot; The Granby Land Trust, The Granby Community Fund, Dave and Jenny Emery, The Percival/Orluk Family, Put and Nannie Brown; Jamie Gamble, Paul Zelanski, Greg and Carol Reid, Dave and Judy Russell, The Cormier Family, and The Granby Artists Association.  The Art Show’s presenting sponsor was Fiduciary Investment Advisors and show supporters included The Center Spirit Shop of Granby and Hayes-Huling & Carmon Funeral Home.

The show – presented by the Land Trust in partnership with the Granby Artists Association - is open through November 30th at J. Vallee Brunelle Fine Art & Framing, which is located at 10 Hartford Avenue in Granby center.  Twenty percent of all art sale proceeds benefit the Granby Land Trust. For more information about the show, visit www.GranbyLandTrust.org or call J. Vallee Brunelle Fine Art & Framing at 860.844.0277.

Since its founding in 1972, the Granby Land Trust has worked to preserve Granby's Natural Heritage through the conservation of its scenic vistas, open space corridors, wildlife habitat, ecologically sensitive areas, and agricultural land.  For more information about this or other upcoming Granby Land Trust events, visit www.GranbyLandTrust.org.

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Paula and Whitey Johnson Receive GLT’s
2007 Mary Edwards Friend of the Land Trust Award

November 5, 2007

In honor of Mary Edwards’ many contributions to Granby and the Granby Land Trust, the Land Trust’s board of directors established the Mary Edwards Friend of the Trust Award in 2004This service award – the Land Trust’s highest honor – is given annually to an individual or organization that has done – through a single gift or collectively over many years – the most to promote the GLT’s mission of “preserving Granby’s natural heritage.”

At the Land Trust’s annual meeting on October 21st, this year’s award was given to a very deserving couple – Paula and Whitey Johnson – who made an early land gift to the Land Trust and generously announced at the Annual Meeting that they would be donating the development rights on approximately 75 acres of their property on Simsbury Road to the Land Trust by the end of the year.

Presentation of the 2007 Mary Edwards Award
To Paula and Whitey Johnson
As presented by Land Trust Board Member Put Brown

“When Paula and Whitey Johnson drive in their car, their license plate proclaims to the world where they come from’  “GRANBY.”  They love this town, are active in its civic and cultural affairs and live their lives, and raised their children, steeped in the values of this place.  One of those values is at the core of what the Granby Land Trust is all about, that maintaining a relationship with the natural world nourishes the soul and is one of the essential ingredients of enjoying a richly satisfying life.  They understand the pleasure that comes from standing under the branches of the Granby Oak, looking northward across the Connecticut River Valley from “Mary’s Rock” or hiking the trails or riding on horseback on this beautiful land behind their own house.  Such experiences engender a sense of wonder and remind one of his or her humble place in the grand scheme of things. 

Paula and Whitey know that we can’t take the natural world for granted and have been active in working to preserve for future generations, including their own heirs, some of the wild places they have known during their own lives.  Not only has Paula served on the Land Trust Board, she and Whitey have made significant gifts of land, first with the donation of the 41-acre Johnson Preserve on Old Messenger Road in West Granby and, just today, with the gift of a conservation easement on the 75-acre parcel on which we hiked today.  These gifts are magnificent in their own rights, of course, but they came at just the right times in the history of the Land Trust.  The first one certainly was a catalyst and created momentum for the preservation of other properties in the area.  The subsequent gifts of 91 acres of the former G. Ray Smith property and of the 100-acre Schlicht Preserve, as well as the Town’s recent purchase of the 57-acre Haddad Preserve, made especially good sense because the Land Trust already had a toe hold in the area because of Paula and Whitey’s gift.  In a sense, they created a matching gift program:  We’ll give our land if others add to the gift in future years.

Today’s gift of a conservation easement, we hope, will be another catalyst gift, but we don’t yet know how this will play out.  We all hope that others will be inspired by their generosity and will make similar donations in the immediate area or, more probably, elsewhere in Town to further some of the exciting land preservation work the Land Trust is doing.  We have such exciting potential right now to accomplish really quite astonishing things.  Momentum is important and the Johnsons’ gift has greatly enhanced that.  Of course, we’ll need the generosity of other philanthropically-minded families, the continued volunteer support of Land Trust Board members and others, financial support from the Community and a large measure of good luck to achieve our goals.  If we continue to have the passion to succeed, we will.

Therefore, in recognition of almost three decades of enthusiastic support for the activities of the Land Trust, their two magnificent gifts, the all-important example their generosity has been in encouraging other donors to follow suit and their deep understanding of why preserving our fragile natural areas is an especially worthy activity in our fast-paced, media-driven world, we present the Mary Edwards Award, the Granby Land Trust’s highest honor, to Paula and Whitey Johnson.  You join a distinguished group, all of whom have been inspired by, and have carried on, Mary’s leadership vision.

Congratulations!”

The Granby Land Trust salutes Paula and Whitey Johnson for all they have done and is proud to give them the 2007 Mary Edwards Friend of the Land Trust Award.

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Granby Land Trust Presents
Granby’s Farms & Orchards Juried Art Show: Art Show Opening This Thursday

October 30, 2007

GRANBY, CT – On Thursday, November 1st, the Granby Land Trust is hosting the show opening for its Granby’s Farms & Orchards Juried Art Show from 5PM – 8PM at J. Vallee Brunelle Fine Art & Framing in Granby Center.  The art show’s thirteen awards will be announced and presented at this time.  This special event is open to the public and all are welcome. 

The Land Trust -  in partnership with the Granby Artists Association - is presenting the Granby’s Farms & Orchards Juried Art Show which opens on November 1st and runs through November 30th.  Juried by Paul Zelanski, this show features original artwork (painted, drawn, photographed or 3-D) inspired by a Granby farm, orchard or agricultural scene.  The art show is being held at J. Vallee Brunelle Fine Art & Framing which is located at 10 Hartford Avenue in Granby Center.  A portion of art sales from the show will benefit the Land Trust. 

“This special art show highlights the importance of agricultural enterprises to our community, both historically and today,” said Land Trust President Rick Orluk.  “The artists and their work encourage us to recognize how fortunate we are to live in Granby and how important it is for us to preserve these beautiful places.  We hope folks will join us on Thursday night and make time to visit the show during the month of November.”

For more information about the show, visit www.GranbyLandTrust.org or call J. Vallee Brunelle Fine Art & Framing at 860.844.0277.  Show supporters include:  Fiduciary Investment Advisors, LLC; Hayes-Huling & Carmon Funeral Home and the Center Spirit Shop.

Since its founding in 1972, the Granby Land Trust has worked to preserve Granby's Natural Heritage through the conservation of its scenic vistas, open space corridors, wildlife habitat, ecologically sensitive areas, and agricultural land.  For more information about this or other upcoming Granby Land Trust events, please visit our website at www.GranbyLandTrust.org .

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Granby Land Trust Announces Fall Event Schedule
Annual Meeting to Be Held on October 21st

September 17, 2007

GRANBY, CT – On October 21, the Granby Land Trust’s Annual Meeting, Hike and Picnic will be held at the home of Paula (GLT board member) and Lowell Johnson from 2 p.m. – 5 p.m. This event will begin with a hike at 2:00 p.m. on the Johnson’s beautiful property on Simsbury Road in West Granby. As always, the walk will be followed by a brief annual meeting - at which the Mary Edwards Friend of the Land Trust Award will be given - and a casual family-friendly picnic at approximately 3:00 p.m.  This event is open to all Granby Land Trust members.  And, if you aren’t a member yet, join before the meeting (just $30 for a family membership) and bring the whole family – you will enjoy meeting other Granby folks while enjoying the outdoors.  The Johnsons live at 289 Simsbury Road in West Granby.  If you plan to attend, please RSVP to Paula Johnson at 653.3132 or phj38@cox.net.

On October 7, the Land Trust is offering a family walk on the Land Trust’s beautiful Mary Edwards Mountain Property during the fall foliage season. This casual, 1 – 1.5 hour long hike will begin at 8 a.m. and be led by GLT board member Dave Emery.  Those planning to attend this hike should meet at the entrance of the Land Trust’s Mary Edwards Mountain Property on Mountain Road in North Granby (entrance is just north of the intersection of Mountain Road and Silkey Road). Please RSVP to Dave Emery at 860.653.3746 or DWE79@aol.com.

Guided by the light of a full Autumn moon, Granby Land Trust board member Dave Emery will lead a Moonlight Hike on Saturday, October 27th, on his property in North Granby.  Hosted by the Granby Land Trust, this hour and a half long hike to the Crag Mountain outlook will begin at 7:00 p.m. at Emery Farm and is open to the public.  This will be a moderate hike and all attendees are encouraged to dress for an evening walk, wear hiking shoes and bring a flashlight.  This event is weather dependent.  Emery Farm is located at 71 Loomis Street in North Granby.  If you and your family would like to attend, please contact Dave Emery at 653.3756 or DWE79@aol.com.           

Since its founding in 1972, the Granby Land Trust has worked to preserve Granby's Natural Heritage through the conservation of its scenic vistas, open space corridors, wildlife habitat, ecologically sensitive areas, and agricultural land.  For more information about these upcoming Granby Land Trust events, visit www.GranbyLandTrust.org.

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Buy Local, Support Farms

June 12, 2007

By John Lyman III from The Hartford Courant, June 12, 2007

While Connecticut has a reputation as a leader in the insurance, pharmaceutical and defense industries, many people may not recognize the Nutmeg State's robust and diverse agricultural industry and the prominent role it plays in the state's economy.

Connecticut-grown products are produced on approximately 4,200 farms across the state. From fruits, vegetables, fish, poultry, dairy products, flowers, maple syrup and even Christmas trees, these businesses pump $2.2 billion into the local economy and provide thousands of jobs.

For the past 20 years, the state Department of Agriculture, through its CT Grown program, has actively promoted the diversity of Connecticut's agriculture and its economic contribution to the state by encouraging consumers to buy locally grown products. CT Grown's efforts have provided meaningful assistance to local farmers and others involved in Connecticut's agricultural industry. The most recent CT Grown initiative is a statewide advertising and public relations campaign called "The Local Flavor," which kicked off last month.

The purpose of this marketing campaign, which includes television, radio, billboard and bus advertising, is to better expose Connecticut residents to the opportunities and benefits of purchasing locally grown products. "The Local Flavor" refers not only to the literal flavor of Connecticut-grown foods, but also the flavor or character that the agricultural industry gives our communities.

Buying locally grown products not only supports Connecticut farmers and the state's economy, but also offers environmental benefits: by decreasing the need to transport agricultural products from long distances; by reducing the need to export Connecticut products to other areas; and by helping to keep the more than 363,000 acres of state farmland active and viable, which preserves precious open spaces and maintains the region's rural, New England character.

According to the Department of Agriculture, Connecticut is losing farmland at one of the fastest rates in the country. In an effort to preserve this precious resource, the state has created the Connecticut FarmLink Program featuring a website that serves as a clearinghouse for the transition between generations of farmers with the goal of keeping farmland in production. Because this farmland is irreplaceable, the state is working to foster a new generation of young farmers who want to pursue a career in agriculture but do not have land to work. The Connecticut Farmlink website helps interested individuals to find farmland partners and helps them to plan for a transition that ensures that farming will continue to thrive in Connecticut for generations to come.

Connecticut agriculture is alive and well. Our state may be small, but we have some of the finest soils in the nation, as well as a favorable climate. Our farmers have demonstrated resiliency and acumen, and stand out as some of the best in the world. We also sit in the midst of a phenomenal market with well-educated and discriminating consumers, willing to pay for good value. The future is bright and offers plenty of opportunity for the next generation willing to work the land.

As Connecticut residents, we all benefit from a thriving agricultural industry and we can do our part in supporting our local farmers and producers by purchasing locally grown products.

John Lyman III, an eighth generation farmer, is executive vice president of Lyman Orchards in Middlefield and president of the Connecticut Agricultural Businesses Cluster.
Copyright 2007, Hartford Courant

Feathered Travelers Need Rest Stops Too

May 20, 2007

By John Weeks, Granby Land Trust Member

Imagine, if you will, driving from Connecticut to Florida with the knowledge that you will find only one rest stop with food available along the entire route. You will count on reaching that stop – you will savor in advance the food you know will have to carry you through all the way to Miami. Now imagine your horror on arriving at this hypothetical “Last Food for a Thousand Miles,” only to find that the restaurant is closed – permanently. Visions of ending up like the Donner Party in the Sierras may swirl before your hunger-racked eyes.

Something like this – only far, far worse – confronts a medium-sized shorebird called the red knot. This remarkable creature annually migrates between its wintering grounds in Tierra del Fuego at the southern tip of Argentina and its nesting zone in the Canadian Arctic. To survive this journey, it has for millennia depended on a reliable source of food located in Delaware Bay, namely, the eggs that horseshoe crabs have deposited by the millions in the beaches there. Close to 100,000 red knots descended each year to feast on this bounty right up until the 1980s. This happy state of affairs suddenly changed drastically for the worse when local fishermen began using the adult horseshoe crabs for bait. No crabs: no eggs: no food for the red knot. The bird’s population has crashed by almost 90 percent, to 13,455 last year. If the fishermen’s practice is not altered, conservationists predict that the North American subspecies of the red knot could be extinct in 2010 – three years from now.

The red knot’s predicament is but an extreme case of the situation faced by many migratory birds in the twenty-first century. The destruction of rainforests in Central and South America is by now familiar to anyone who has ever bought a grande at Starbucks. Former Vice President Al Gore and others have spread the word about melting floe ice in the Arctic. Less well known, however, is the fact that birds need places to stop, rest and refuel along the way between the endpoints of their long journeys. Fighting to save tropical forests and tundra will all be to no avail if birds can find no place to rest and feed in between.

This is where bird conservation comes home to all of us, even here in Granby. The red knot doesn’t visit us, but many other birds do. Some of them you will see at your backyard feeders, especially in spring and fall when they are embarked on their long and perilous travels. Others will remain largely undetected yet present, if only briefly, in our fields, marshes and woods. They need these places as desperately as they need their ultimate destinations far to the north or south.

I have led several bird walks in town, and the participants have marveled at the beauty of these wondrous pilgrims. Earlier this month, my wife Chris and I led two such walks offered by the Granby Land Trust in North Granby on which we observed more than fifty species of birds. They ranged from an uncommon marsh bird, the Virginia rail, to the rarely seen Bay-breasted Warbler. Perhaps most gratifying of all was an adult bald eagle that swept by overhead. As recently as the 1970s, this majestic species stood on the verge of extinction east of the Mississippi. Now, thanks to the concerted efforts of citizens, conservation groups and governments, our nation’s symbol is once again a familiar sight.

The people of Granby have been far-sighted enough to recognize the value of preserving natural spaces in our town while there are still such spaces to save. We humans benefit by being able to live in a remarkably beautiful place, and the local animals that share this place also benefit in obvious ways. Our transient guests from the avian world, though it is far less apparent to the casual observer, depend on us “to keep a light on at the inn” for them. Thanks to the work of the Granby Land Trust, Holcomb Farm and McLean Game Refuge, as well as the unsung efforts of many private citizens of the town, that light shines brightly. May it never go out. The red knot illustrates what the alternative could be.

Daisy Girl Scouts Earn Patch Letterboxing on Land Trust’s Godard Preserve

May 20, 2007

By Sandra Fischer

North Granby, CT -- It was the first gorgeous day of Spring when fifteen Daisy Girl Scouts went on a treasure hunt through the Granby Land Trust’s Godard Preserve in North Granby in search of a hidden letterbox.  The torrential rains of the week before were over, and off they went “into the woods.” 

The aim was to earn their “Courageous and Strong” Patch.  To do this, they had to find a letterbox planted deep within Granby Land Trust property.  “A letterbox, what’s that?” they asked.   The girls were then told that a typical letterbox includes a stamp, stamp pad, pen, and record book, which are left at the letterbox site.  These supplies are hidden, usually in a plastic container, behind a rock, inside a hollow tree, or in some other creative spot. To find the letterbox, you must follow written clues.  The clues to the location of this particular letterbox were found on the Granby Land Trust Website, www.granbylandtrust.org.  It was explained that when you visit a letterbox, you bring your own personal record book and stamp, so that you can not only mark the book left on site, but also use the stamp on site to mark your book.  The Daisy Scouts brought their “Troop 6125 Record Book” so that they could record their accomplishment as a group, and also individual books to record their personal adventures.   Yes, they found the letterbox, and each girl proved that she was “courageous and strong!”

The Granby Land Trust is excited to announce that it has planted letterboxes on three of its properties; The Godard Preserve, The Mary Edwards Mountain Property and the Western Barndoor Hill Preserve.  Letterboxing is a great way to add some excitement to a family walk in the woods.  Kids love following the clues to find the hidden “treasure” and collecting new stamps in their notebooks.  To obtain clues to the letterboxes hidden on Granby Land Trust properties, go to www.granbylandtrust.org/letterbox .

To learn more about letterboxing, and obtain clues to the many letterboxes in Connecticut State Forests and other Granby locations, as the Holcomb Farm, you can visit www.letterboxing.org.

Since its founding in 1972, the Granby Land Trust has worked to preserve Granby's Natural Heritage through the conservation of its scenic vistas, open space corridors, wildlife habitat, ecologically sensitive areas, and agricultural land.  To become a member of the Granby Land Trust or learn more upcoming Granby Land Trust events, please visit our website at www.GranbyLandTrust.org .

Arborworks Donates Time and Service to Care for Granby Oak: Tree in Good Health

March 22, 2007

The Granby Land Trust would like to thank Brian Watkins - a Granby native - and his company, Arborworks, for their continued care of the Land Trust's Granby Oak. Brian has generously donated his time and service to care for and monitor the health of the Granby Oak over the last several years. Recently, Arborworks recruited Arbor Services of Washington Depot to help them with some tree maintenance done during February (you may have seen them and their trucks on Day Street performing this work - see the attached photos). The Land Trust would also like to recognize and thank Arbor Services for donating their time, services and equipment to care for this beautiful tree.

On behalf of the Granby Land Trust board, we are happy to report that the Granby Oak is in "good health" for a tree "of its age" and we thank Arborworks and Arbor Services for their generous help and support. Please click here to see an in-depth report on work done and general health of the Granby Oak as provided by Brian Watkins.

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www.granbylandtrust.org, PO Box 23, Granby, CT 06035