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News Releases 2004-2006

November 2006
The McLean Game Refuge Adds 196 acres

November 13 , 2006
Granby Land Trust’s Granby’s Natural Landscape Juried Art Show Opens Award Winners Announced

October 31, 2006
Granby Land Trust Presents Granby’s Natural Landscape Juried Art Show: Art Show Opening This Thursday

October 2006
CHARITABLE GIVING ALERT: Donations to Charities from IRA Accounts

September 18 , 2006           
New Laws on Conservation Easements Offer A Window of Opportunity to Preserve Your Property

September 6 , 2006           
Granby Land Trust to Host Granby’s Natural Landscape Art and Nature Discussion and Plein Air Painting Demonstration on September 17th

May 15 , 2006           
Land Trust’s Mary Edwards Property A Bird Haven

April 10, 2006           
Granby Land Trust Spring Bird Walk Scheduled for Saturday, May 6th on Mary Edwards Mountain Property

March 8, 2006           
Granby Land Trust to Hold Spring Preserve Our Properties Day on Sunday, April 9th: Please Join Us!

January 9, 2006
Granby Land Trust to Hold Showshoe Hike on Godard Preserve on January 22nd

November 11, 2005
Seth and Lucy Holcombe Receive GLT’s 2005 Mary Edwards Friend of the Land Trust Award

October 14, 2005
Herbert and Mildred Dewey Preserve Humphrey Family Farmland as a Family Legacy Through Gift to Granby Land Trust

October 14, 2005
Land Trust Annual Meeting Scheduled for October 23rd on Gamble Property in North Granby

September 19, 2005
Land Trust Takes Action to Protect Granby Oak

August 22, 2005
Award-Winning Author and UConn Geology Professor Robert Thorson to Discuss History of New England Stone Walls at September 18th Land Trust Event

June 22, 2005
Granby Land Trust to Hold Family Hike on Mary Edwards Mountain Property on July 16th

June 22, 2005
Brian Behrens Helps Granby Land Trust As Part of Eagle Scout Project

May 23, 2005
Granby Land Trust Writes Congresswoman Nancy Johnson to Oppose Weakening of Conservation Tax Incentives
See letter below... The Land Trust encourages you to contact Congresswoman Johnson to voice your interest in maintaining tax incentives which help us protect open space in Granby. Thank you.

May 17, 2005
Granby Land Trust Announces Upcoming Special Events

May 2, 2005
Granby Land Trust Spring Bird Walk Scheduled for Saturday, May 7th on Godard Preserve

April 28, 2005
Schlicht Family Donates 94-Acres in West Granby to Land Trust

April 10, 2005
Granby Land Trust Holds Spring Preserve Our Properties Day

October 24, 2004
Ray Betts Awarded Granby Land Trust’s Highest Honor

October 24, 2004
Granby Land Trust Holds Annual Meeting Elects Officers and Board Members

October 18, 2004
Drummer Letter to the Editor

September 18, 2004
What Trees are These? Common Species of the Farmington River Valley

The McLean Game Refuge Adds 196 acres

November 2006

By Put Brown

On October 31, the Trustees of the McLean Fund acquired the 196-acre “Reynolds Preserve” from members of that family, filling in the last major in-holding in the McLean Game Refuge, which now sweeps across 4,446 acres of land, or just under seven square miles. A quick look at the map shows the significance to the Game Refuge and to the vast assemblage of permanently preserved open space land in the area.

To the south of the new acquisition lies 1,800 acres of the McLean Game Refuge, part of Senator McLean’s original holdings, which have been designated by the United States Department of the Interior as a “National Landmark Area. That land, and most probably the newly acquired Reynolds Preserve, which really is a natural extension of it, will be left to grow into a mature “climax” forest, free of improvements other than occasional trails, signs and other minor intrusions. To the east and north lies the Messenger Preserve which was donated to McLean by Edna Messenger, with the help of The Nature Conservancy. The Caruso-Collamore-Carpenter Preserve, added to the Game Refuge through the generosity of members of the Collamore and Carpenter families and a generous grant from Bank of America, as Trustee for Frank Caruso, abuts the Reynolds Preserve along other portions of the northern boundary and to the west, as well. But that isn’t the whole story! The Game Refuge itself abuts the 2,500-acre Enders State Forest, the Town-owned Holcomb Farm, Salmon Brook Park and various parcels owned by the Granby and Simsbury Land Trusts. Adding all of these parcels together brings the total to about 8,000 acres of contiguous permanently preserved open space.

Each of these acquisitions began with an extraordinarily generous landowner who appreciated the significance of his or her parcel in the broader context of the assembled whole and sometimes involved a grant from a foundation or other source. Just think of the people involved and imagine their individual and collective contributions -- Senator McLean, Tudor and Laura Holcomb, Edna Messenger, Frank Caruso, Frances Peterson, Bertha Dimock, Mary Edwards, Andrew Mason, PK Allen, members of the Enders, Worthen and Schiro families, The Nature Conservancy, the Hartford Foundation for Public Giving, the Connecticut DEP, the Town of Granby, the Granby and Simsbury Land Trusts and hundreds of individuals who have contributed to the effort to set aside all of these parcels. It is astounding that, over the course of the last 30 years or so, all of these people and institutions have come together to fill in the various pieces of a very complex, but now elegantly beautiful, puzzle.

The latest addition to this assemblage was made possible by members of the Reynolds family, for whom the Preserve is to be named, a gift from the State of Connecticut under the DEP’s matching grant program, donor-advised funds at the Hartford Foundation for Public Giving held for Dick and Lina Wagner, on the one hand, and members of the Bernard and Dorothy Auerbach Schiro family, on the other, and a contribution from the McLean endowment (which the Trustees hope to restore with future fund-raising).

While we all should celebrate this most recent acquisition, let us not forget the many others that came before it. To more fully understand the overall picture, get a map of the McLean Game Refuge (they are available at the Granby Public Library or at www.McLeanCare.org) and check out www.GranbyLandTrust.org. You’ll be amazed, especially if you follow up with occasional hikes through some of this land. There are abandoned roads, magnificent streams and waterfalls, stone walls, abandoned cellar holes, ancient trees and views that, in the right light, will take your breath away. As you wander through this landscape, think of all of those generous donors who came together from different walks of life, different backgrounds and widely different financial backgrounds to assemble all of this land for the protection of wildlife habitat, scenic vistas and recreational areas. It really is quite an astounding story, and it happened right here in Granby!

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Granby Land Trust’s Granby’s Natural Landscape Juried Art Show Opens Award Winners Announced

November 13, 2006

GRANBY, CT – On Thursday, November 2nd, the Granby Land Trust’s Granby’s Natural Landscape Juried Art Show opened at J. Vallee Brunelle Fine Art & Framing in Granby Center.  With a full house on hand featuring many of the participating artists and a large crowd of art enthusiasts, the juried art show’s ten awards were presented.  Jane Zisk of Wethersfield and Nina Ritson of Norfolk won the top two show awards - The Granby Land Trust Award and The Don and Marty Wilmot Award. 

Juried by acclaimed artist Stephen Brown of Granville, Massachusetts, the show features original artwork (painted, drawn or photographed) exclusively from the from the Land Trust’s Mary Edwards Mountain Property and The Godard Preserve.   Award winners were as follows:  The Granby Land Trust Award – Jane Zisk/Autumn Road; The Don and Marty Wilmot Award – Nina Ritson/View of Mary Edwards Property; The Mildred Dewey Award – Mary Nason/On the Yellow Trail; The Tudor and Laura Holcomb Award – Sally Sargent Markey/View Northwest – Mary Edwards Property; The Stephen Brown Award – Pam Jones/Ring Brook; The Godard Preserve Award – Laura J. Eden/Summer’s Last Triumph; The Granby Artists Association Award – Hannah Libman/Fall-Granby; The Holcomb Farm Learning Centers Award – Mary Nason/Up The Trail; The Matthew K. Orluk Award – John Walker/Boulders; and, The Ray Betts Award – Mary Anne Miller/View From Mary’s Window.

Show awards were underwritten by:  Don and Marty Wilmot; Put and Nannie Brown; Stephen Brown, The Cormier Family, The Orluk Family, The Granby Land Trust, The Granby Artists Association and  The Holcomb Farm Learning Centers.  Two anonymous donors funded the Mildred Dewey and Ray Betts Awards.  The Art Show received special support from Table & Vine of Northampton, Massachusetts, Greg and Carol Reid, and Lost Acres Orchard of North Granby.

The show – presented by the Land Trust in partnership with the Granby Artists Association and the Holcomb Farm Learning Centers - is open through November 30th at J. Vallee Brunelle Fine Art & Framing, which is located at 10 Hartford Avenue in Granby center.  Twenty percent of all art sale proceeds benefit the Granby Land Trust. For more information about the show, visit www.GranbyLandTrust.org or call J. Vallee Brunelle Fine Art & Framing at 860.844.0277.

Since its founding in 1972, the Granby Land Trust has worked to preserve Granby's Natural Heritage through the conservation of its scenic vistas, open space corridors, wildlife habitat, ecologically sensitive areas, and agricultural land.  For more information about this or other upcoming Granby Land Trust events, please visit our website at www.GranbyLandTrust.org.

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Granby Land Trust Presents Granby’s Natural Landscape Juried Art Show:
Art Show Opening This Thursday

October 31, 2006

On Thursday, November 2nd, the Granby Land Trust is hosting the show opening for its Granby’s Natural Landscape Juried Art Show from 5PM – 8PM at J. Vallee Brunelle Fine Art & Framing in Granby Center. The art show’s ten awards will be announced and presented at this time. This special event is open to the public and all are welcome.

The Land Trust - in partnership with the Granby Artists Association and the Holcomb Farm Learning Centers - is presenting the Granby’s Natural Landscape Juried Art Show which opens on November 2nd and runs through November 30th. Juried by renowned artist Stephen Brown, this show features original artwork (painted, drawn or photographed) from the Land Trust’s Mary Edwards Mountain Property and The Godard Preserve. The art show is being held at J. Vallee Brunelle Fine Art & Framing which is located at 10 Hartford Avenue in Granby center. A portion of art sales from the show will benefit the Land Trust.

“This special art show will give you a glimpse of Granby’s natural beauty through the eyes of its artists,” said Land Trust President Rick Orluk. “The region has so many talented artists who are regularly inspired by the landscape who then inspire us to recognize how fortunate we are to live in Granby. We hope folks will join us on Thursday night and make time to visit the show during the month of November.”

For more information about the show, visit www.GranbyLandTrust.org or call J. Vallee Brunelle Fine Art & Framing at 860.844.0277.

Since its founding in 1972, the Granby Land Trust has worked to preserve Granby's Natural Heritage through the conservation of its scenic vistas, open space corridors, wildlife habitat, ecologically sensitive areas, and agricultural land. For more information about this or other upcoming Granby Land Trust events, please visit our website at www.GranbyLandTrust.org.

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CHARITABLE GIVING ALERT: Donations to Charities from IRA Accounts

October 2006

Special to The Granby Drummer
By Put Brown

In the Pension Reform Bill that President Bush signed into law in August, Congress created a significant tax incentive for charitable gifts from IRA accounts owned by people over 70½ years of age. For the next two years only -- that is, through 2007 -- a person can have as much as $100,000 a year paid to a qualified charity such as the Granby Land Trust without triggering federal income tax. The money must be paid directly to the charity and it counts towards the required minimum IRA distribution. The new incentive is especially attractive to citizens of Connecticut, because Connecticut taxes are avoided, too.

Think what this means! If you are 70½ years of age or older, have a substantial IRA account, want to make a charitable gift and don’t need the minimum IRA distribution this year or next, you can transfer up to $100,000 each year to a charity of your choice. You won’t get a deduction, but you won’t need one, because the amount of the contribution will never have come into your adjusted gross income. Nor will your contribution be limited to a percentage (usually 30%) of your adjusted gross income. Finally, since Connecticut taxes a percentage of taxpayer’s adjusted gross income, but does not allow deductions for most charitable contributions, a qualifying taxpayer transferring funds to a charity directly from an IRA will save Connecticut taxes, too. And, of course, the donor’s estate taxes may well be reduced, because the donor’s IRA account will be smaller at the time of his or her death than it otherwise would be.

The Land Trust will put more information, including helpful examples, on its web site. If you are of the right age and financial circumstances and might be interested in contributing to a charity from your IRA, please check out www.GranbyLandTrust.org. But act quickly. The window of opportunity expires in 2008.

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New Laws on Conservation Easements Offer A Window of Opportunity to Preserve Your Property

September 18, 2006  

Special to The Granby Drummer
By Put Brown

Suppose that you own a beautiful piece of land, perhaps near your house, or maybe an agricultural parcel or one on which you conduct forestry operations. It could be a large parcel or something smaller, such as a field or a wooded area near your house. Suppose, too, that you delight in its natural character, see it as a wildlife corridor or as a horseback trail for use by the broader community or just want to keep it in the family, now or forever, free of development or other changes.

If you have been thinking along these lines, you might consider the gift of a conservation easement, which would maintain the land in private ownership, define how you and your successors could use it, prevent development on it and, if the gift is properly structured, afford a generous tax deduction. Over the years, the Granby Land Trust – working with partner organizations such as the Town, the State, McLean Game Refuge and other national conservation-minded organizations such as The Nature Conservancy -- has worked with many, many landowners who want to achieve these goals. Some of these discussions have matured into gifts of conservation easements; others have not, for one reason or another.

The great appeal of conservation easements is that the specific provisions of them, those that define what is allowed and prohibited, can be custom-tailored to each landowner’s individual situation and desires. Last year, for instance, Herbert and Margaret Dewey generously granted a conservation easement on their land on Loomis Street in North Granby. Their deed of gift also reserved life interests in the property and, upon their deaths, transferred it to the Land Trust, thus assuring the long term preservation of almost 40 acres of prime agricultural land. Limited only by the requirements of the Internal Revenue Code, which have to be considered if the landowner is interested (as most are) in receiving a tax deduction for the gift, and by the donee organization’s own acceptance standards, the possibilities are endless. The Land Trust has considerable expertise in this area and is always happy to talk, without obligation either way, to potential donors.

On August 17 of this year, President Bush signed legislation that very substantially enhances the potential tax benefits of donations of conservation easements made before December 31, 2007. The new law extends the carry-forward period for tax deductions from 5 to 15 years and raises the cap on those deductions from 30% of a donor’s adjusted gross income to 50% or to 100% for qualifying farmers and ranchers. Perhaps the rules will be extended beyond 2007, but there is no assurance that they will.

Think what this means. A donor may donate a conservation easement to the Land Trust or to any other qualifying charity and, in so doing, may keep the land in the family, restrict its development in perpetuity, enjoy an immediate income tax benefit and carry-forward whatever unused deduction there might be for up to 15 years. Such a gift would also decrease estate taxes, because the fair market value of the land at the date of death would be less than it otherwise would be on account of the earlier grant of the conservation easement.

The Land Trust Alliance, with which the Granby Land Trust has worked for years, has a very informative web site, which you can find at www.lta.org. The many links to various topics cover much of what is going on in the field. Earlier this year, following the publication of a report of the Senate Finance Committee, which criticized many of the tax deductions that had been claimed before, it looked as if the deductibility of gifts of conservation easements would be severely circumscribed. Thanks to the work of the LTA and its colleagues, including the Granby Land Trust, Congress passed and the President signed the very different legislation which now is the law. The new laws give greater flexibility and benefits to landowners who donate the development rights on their properties.

If you are in the lucky position of having land you want to protect from future development, the first step would be to think about what portion of your land would be subject to the conservation easement (you can carve out a portion of your land which would be free of any development restrictions at all). If you have a map, mark it up with what you have in mind. Think about what rights you want to retain and then call the Land Trust. You can find out how to do that, and can learn about the Land Trust, by going to www.GranbyLandTrust.org. Experts there will guide you through the process, suggest specific documentation for approval by your own attorney and, if the Land Trust is not the best steward, suggest other alternatives. It is easy! You also can change your mind anywhere along the way if, upon further consideration, the gift of a conservation easement does not suit your own situation.

If you do make a gift of a conservation easement, the tax advantages, especially for gifts made before 2008, could be compellingly attractive. Most importantly, of course, you will have the personal satisfaction of knowing that you have helped to preserve Granby’s natural heritage.

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Granby Land Trust to Host Granby’s Natural Landscape Art and Nature Discussion and Plein Air Painting Demonstration on September 17th
Granby’s Natural Landscape Art Show to Follow in November

September 6, 2006                         

GRANBY, CT – The Granby Land Trust is excited to announce that it is hosting a special Art and Nature Discussion & Plein Air Painting Demonstration on Sunday, September 17th on the Land Trust’s spectacular Mary Edwards Mountain Property.

Titled Granby’s Natural Landscape, this event will begin at 12 noon with a lunch-time panel discussion by some of Granby’s most distinguished artists – painters and photographers - who will discuss the relationship between art and nature, how they work outdoors and the materials/process they use to create their art. Following the talk, event attendees will be able to walk the Mary Edwards Mountain Property and see artists working plein air around the property. Artists scheduled to participate include: Carole Day, Laura Eden, Wendy van Welie, William Simpson, Suzanne Roz Magoon, Anna Moberly and Rick Matheny among others.

“This special event will give you a glimpse of Granby’s natural beauty through the eyes of its artists,” said Land Trust President Rick Orluk. “Granby has so many talented artists who are regularly inspired by the landscape who then inspire us to recognize how fortunate we are to live in Granby. We hope folks will join us for an interesting day exploring the beauty of our natural landscape.”

Beginning on November 2nd, the Granby Land Trust – in partnership with the Granby Artists Association and the Holcomb Farm Learning Centers – will present a juried art show Granby’s Natural Landscape at J. Vallee Brunelle Fine Art & Framing which features original work (painted, drawn or photographed) from the Land Trust’s Mary Edwards Mountain Property and the Godard Preserve. A portion of art sales from the show will benefit the Land Trust. J. Vallee Brunelle Fine Art & Framing is located in Granby center.

The Land Trust’s Mary Edwards Mountain Property Preserve is located on Mountain Road in North Granby (preserve parking and the trailhead is located less than a ¼ north of Mountain Road’s intersection with Silkey Road on the right). This event is open to the public; please RSVP to Rick Orluk by calling 860.653.7095 or emailing to Rick_Orluk@GoldOrluk.com. A picnic lunch prepared by Lost Acres Orchard will be available but must be ordered in advance – see www.GranbyLandTrust.org for details. The rain date for this event is Sunday, September 24th.

Long-time Land Trust supporter Mary Edwards donated the beautiful 200-acre Mary Edwards Mountain Property to the Granby Land Trust in 2000. The Mary Edwards Mountain Property is open to the public and includes a well-marked trail system accessible by trailheads located on Mountain Road and Donahue Road. Trail Maps are available at www.GranbyLandTrust.org or at the trailhead boxes.
Since its founding in 1972, the Granby Land Trust has worked to preserve Granby's Natural Heritage through the conservation of its scenic vistas, open space corridors, wildlife habitat, ecologically sensitive areas, and agricultural land. For more information about this or other upcoming Granby Land Trust events, please visit our website at www.GranbyLandTrust.org.

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Land Trust’s Mary Edwards Property A Bird Haven
50 Species Sighted during Spring Bird Walk

May 15, 2006

GRANBY, CT – On May 6th, Granby Land Trust members and avid birders John Weeks and Chris Chinni led the Land Trust’s Annual Spring Bird Walk on the spectacular Mary Edwards Mountain Property in North Granby and approximately 50 bird species were obeserved.  Following the walk, Weeks said that he was “confident that over the course of a full year” 100 bird species could be found on the property and “this gives just a quick hint of how valuable land acquisitions like this are for preserving wildlife habitat.”

Of the birds found on the Mary Edwards Mountain Property, three species – an Orchard Oriole, a Black-billed Cuckoo and a Virginia Rail - were particularly good finds according to Weeks who noted that, “birders are always particularly happy to find relatively uncommon species like these.”   

Hearing the call of a Black-billed Cuckoo near the old farm pond, Weeks played the bird’s call on his Ipod speakers and lured the bird out into the open – treating the group to a good sighting of the slender and long-tailed, foot-long Black-billed Cuckoo on a tree branch.   Weeks also tried to locate the Virginia Rail he had seen earlier in the week hiding in the cattails on the edge of the farm pond, but the fairly small (7.5 inches), short-tailed, round-winged, ground-dwelling marsh bird had either moved on or chose not to make an appearance for his audience.  Just below the farm pond in a meadow near Donahue Road, a female Orchard Oriole (yellowish underparts and greenish-gray upperparts) was spotted before the walk changed course to enjoy the morning view from Mary’s Rock.

During the two-hour walk, the following birds were found on the Mary Edwards Property: Turkey Vulture; Red-shouldered Hawk; Mourning Dove; Black-billed Cuckoo; Chimney Swift; Red-bellied Woodpecker; Yellow-bellied Sapsucker; Hairy Woodpecker; Northern Flicker; Eastern Phoebe; Blue-headed Vireo; Blue Jay; American Crow; Tree Swallow; Barn Swallow; Black-capped Chickadee; Tufted Titmouse; White-breasted Nuthatch; Wood Thrush; American Robin; Gray Catbird; Northern Mockingbird; Cedar Waxwing; Northern Parula; Yellow Warbler; Chestnut-sided Warbler; Black-throated Blue Warbler; Yellow-rumped Warbler; Black-throated Green Warbler; Blackburnian Warbler; Black-and-white Warbler; Ovenbird; Common Yellowthroat; Scarlet Tanager; Eastern Towhee; Song Sparrow; Northern Cardinal; Rose-breasted Grosbeak; Red-winged Blackbird; Common Grackle; Orchard Oriole (female); Baltimore Oriole; and an American Goldfinch.  During Weeks’ earlier scouting trips the two days before he also observed:  Virginia Rail; Downy Woodpecker; Least Flycatcher; Hermit Thrush; Blue-winged Warbler; Nashville Warbler; Chipping Sparrow; White-throated Sparrow; and a  Brown-headed Cowbird.

Long-time Land Trust supporter Mary Edwards donated the beautiful 200-acre Mary Edwards Mountain Property to the Granby Land Trust in 2000.  The Mary Edwards Mountain Property is open to the public and includes a well-marked trail system accessible by trailheads located on Mountain Road and Donahue Road.  Trail Maps are available at www.GranbyLandTrust.org or at the trailhead boxes.

Since its founding in 1972, the Granby Land Trust has worked to preserve Granby's Natural Heritage through the conservation of its scenic vistas, open space corridors, wildlife habitat, ecologically sensitive areas, and agricultural land.  For more information about this or other upcoming Granby Land Trust events, please visit our website at www.GranbyLandTrust.org.

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Land Trust Bird Walk participants - led by John Weeks and Chris Chinni - looking for Virginia Rail seen earlier in the week in the farm pond cattails on the Mary Edwards Property.

Bird Walk attendees checking out the treetops in search of warblers (8 species of warblers were found during the walk).

Granby Land Trust Spring Bird Walk Scheduled for Saturday, May 6th on Mary Edwards Mountain Property

April 10, 2006                         

GRANBY, CT – The Granby Land Trust is hosting a Spring Bird Walk on Saturday morning, May 6th, from 7:00 AM to 9:00 AM at the Land Trust’s spectacular Mary Edwards Mountain Property.

The bird walk will be led by GLT Member and avid birder John Weeks.  The walk will begin at 7:00 AM at the Mountain Road entrance to the Mary Edwards Mountain Property Preserve that is located on Mountain Road in North Granby (preserve parking and the trailhead is located less than a ¼ north of Mountain Road’s intersection with Silkey Road on the right).  This event is open to the public, but space is limited -- please RSVP to John Weeks by calling 860.844.8965.  Birders should bring binoculars.  The rain date for this event is Sunday, May 7th.

Long-time Land Trust supporter Mary Edwards donated the beautiful 200-acre Mary Edwards Mountain Property to the Granby Land Trust in 2000.  The Mary Edwards Mountain Property is open to the public and includes a well-marked trail system accessible by trailheads located on Mountain Road and Donahue Road.  Trail Maps are available at www.GranbyLandTrust.org or at the trailhead boxes.

Since its founding in 1972, the Granby Land Trust has worked to preserve Granby's Natural Heritage through the conservation of its scenic vistas, open space corridors, wildlife habitat, ecologically sensitive areas, and agricultural land.  For more information about this or other upcoming Granby Land Trust events, please visit our website at www.GranbyLandTrust.org .

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Granby Land Trust to Hold Spring Preserve Our Properties Day on Sunday,
April 9th:
Please Join Us!

March 8, 2006           

GRANBY, CT—Get out those rakes, saws and clippers and put on your outdoor work clothes—you are invited to join the Land Trust for our Spring Preserve Our Properties Day on Sunday, April 9th from 1:00-4:00 PM. With Spring on the way and people spending more time outside, this annual event helps us clean-up our properties and their trails after the long winter. 

Citizens wishing to help should meet at 1 PM at the Land Trust’s Godard Preserve entrance on upper Donahue Road (entrance closest to Mountain Road). From this meeting point, work groups will be established and sent off to Land Trust properties around town. Please dress in warm work clothes and gloves.  If would also be helpful if you could bring assorted tools (saws, clippers, rakes, etc…) to help with the property clean-up. 

This is a great opportunity to enjoy an afternoon with friends and meet fellow Land Trust members. If you can attend, for planning purposes, please let event coordinator Mark Wetzel know by calling or emailing himl at 860.653.9125 or at M.Wetzel3@cox.net.

Since its founding in 1972, the Granby Land Trust has worked to preserve Granby's Natural Heritage through the conservation of its scenic vistas, open space corridors, wildlife habitat, ecologically sensitive areas, and agricultural land.  To become a member of the Granby Land Trust or learn more upcoming Granby Land Trust events, please visit our website at www.GranbyLandTrust.org.

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Granby Land Trust to Hold Showshoe Hike on Godard Preserve on January 22nd

January 9, 2006

Granby, CT – On Sunday, January 22nd, you are invited to join the Granby Land Trust for a snowshoe hike on the Land Trust's Godard Preserve.  This hike will begin at 1:00PM and be led by GLT Board Member Dave Emery.  The hike will start at the upper Godard Preserve entrance off of Mountain Road in North Granby.  The hike is scheduled for 1 - 3PM.  If there is not enough snow for snowshoes, a regular winter hike will be offered. 

If you plan to attend, please contact Dave Emery at 860.653.3746 or by email at DWE79@aol.com.

The Granby Land Trust works to preserve Granby’s Natural Heritage through the conservation of its scenic vistas, open space corridors, wildlife habitat, ecologically sensitive areas, and agricultural land.  Working with a range of conservation partners, the Land Trust is committed to forever preserving Granby’s rural character and its beautiful places.  For more information about the Land Trust’s history, membership and activities, please visit www.GranbyLandTrust.org.

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Seth and Lucy Holcombe Receive GLT’s 2005 Mary Edwards Friend of the Land Trust Award

November 11 , 2005

In honor of Mary Edwards’ many contributions to Granby and the Granby Land Trust, the Land Trust’s board of directors established the Mary Edwards Friend of the Trust Award in 2004. This service award – the Land Trust’s highest honor – is given annually to an individual or organization that has done – through a single gift or collectively over many years – the most to promote the GLT’s mission of “preserving Granby’s natural heritage.”

At the Land Trust’s annual meeting on October 23rd, this year’s award was given to a very deserving couple - Seth and Lucy Holcombe.  Members of the Land Trust for more than 30 years, the Holcombes have supported the Land Trust in so many ways and been an important part of its growth and success.  Their support has come in many forms – they have loyally attended Land Trust events since 1974, when they moved to town, and they have given a significant conservation easement to the Land Trust over a magnificent piece of their North Granby property. 

Like Mary, Seth and Lucy certainly share a reverence for the heritage of Granby.  They have been active in the Salmon Brook Historical Society, which works to preserve Granby’s cultural heritage. But that heritage is intimately connected to people’s relationships with the land, so it is not surprising that Seth and Lucy would also be active in the affairs of the Land Trust, which works to preserve Granby’s natural heritage.  These are two sides of the same coin - the common elements are place and heritage.

Mary shared these interests and was active in the affairs of the Salmon Brook Historical Society as well. They were friends and worked together in each of those venues. Thus, it is exquisitely appropriate to recognize their enthusiasm, their sustained loyalty and their shared values by granting to them, as a couple, the Land Trust’s highest honor and an award named for such a like-minded individual, Mary Edwards.

The Granby Land Trust salutes Seth and Lucy Holcombe for all they have done and is proud to give them 2005 Mary Edwards Friend of the Land Trust Award.

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GLT Board Members Rick Orluk and Put Brown present 2005 Mary Edwards Friend of the Land Trust Award to Seth and Lucy Holcombe at the Land Trust Annual Meeting on October 23rd on the Gamble Property in North Granby.

Herbert and Mildred Dewey Preserve Humphrey Family Farmland as a Family Legacy Through Gift to Granby Land Trust

October 17, 2005

For generations, the Humphrey family farmed a large parcel of land on Loomis Street in North Granby, and the Humphrey family name was known throughout town. Now a portion of the Humphrey family’s land will be preserved forever, as Mildred (Humphrey) Dewey and her husband, Herbert Dewey (who, by the way, also descends from a family with a long farming history in Granby) have decided to donate 40 acres of the original Humphrey Farm to the Granby Land Trust.

Because the Deweys cherish their land dearly, they want to continue to control the property, hike on the trails along its perimeter and oversee the activities of the farmer who grows corn on much of it.  Therefore, their deed had to be structured differently than a standard deed conveying “fee simple” (outright) ownership to the Land Trust. The instrument of conveyance that was agreed upon incorporates elements of a conservation easement, a conveyance of outright ownership following the expiration of lifetime estates, and undertakings by the Land Trust with the stipulation that the land continue to be made available for farming — forever celebrating the Humphrey and Dewey families’ place in Granby history.

The gift also entitled the Deweys to a significant tax deduction, although they were quick to note that they were not motivated by its availability. As Mildred said, that was just “icing on the cake.”  The resulting agreement states that, for as long as the Deweys are alive, they can continue to treat their land as private property, subject only to the restrictions in the deed, assuring that the land will remain suitable for farming. Following their deaths, the Dewey’s land will be permanently preserved by the Land Trust and continue to be made available for agricultural uses. 

Perhaps the Dewey’s generosity and interest in preserving Granby’s natural heritage will be an inspiration to others. We certainly hope so. We are proud to have been chosen by the Deweys to steward their property and we pledge to do our best to be worthy of this role.

The Granby Land Trust works to preserve Granby's Natural Heritage through the conservation of its scenic vistas, open space corridors, wildlife habitat, ecologically sensitive areas, and agricultural land.  To learn more about the Granby Land Trust, please visit www.GranbyLandTrust.org

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Land Trust Annual Meeting Scheduled for October 23rdon Gamble Property in North Granby

October 14, 2005

GRANBY, CT -- All Granby Land Trust members are invited to attend the Annual Meeting, Walk and Picnic on Sunday, October 23 at 2:00 PM.  This year’s event will be held at the scenic 200-acre property owned by Granby Land Trust member and friend Jamie Gamble located at 253 Loomis Street in North Granby.   Land Trust members will not want to miss the opportunity to see and enjoy this beautiful piece of property.

This event will start with a walk on the property, followed by a brief annual meeting and a picnic.  The Land Trust will provide hot dogs and hamburgers and beverages – we ask that those attending bring a side salad for all to enjoy.  This is a great opportunity to enjoy an afternoon with friends and meet fellow Land Trust members.

If you plan to attend, please RSVP to Rick Orluk at 860.653.7095 or Rick_Orluk@GoldOrluk.com. For more information about the Granby Land Trust and other upcoming events, please visit www.GranbyLandTrust.org.

DIRECTIONS TO JAMIE GAMBLE PROPERTY, 253 LOOMIS STREET, NORTH GRANBY:  From East Street, take Loomis Street for several miles to 253 Loomis Street.  Entrance to property is on the left side of the road through a farm gate which will be marked for the event.  If you reach the Massachusetts State Line, you have gone too far.  

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Land Trust Takes Action to Protect Granby Oak

September 19 , 2005

If you take a close look at the Granby Oak, you might notice that a number of leaves have prematurely turned brown and/or certain branches have experienced dieback.  We at the Land Trust have noticed too so we had arborist Brian Watkins examine the tree and provide a report to the Land Trust Board in July.

We are glad to report that the Oak has a common leaf spot disease called Oak anthracnose that is aesthetically displeasing, but should not cause permanent damage.  According to the University of Minnesota Extension Service, oak anthracnose produces irregular spots/blotches randomly over the leaf.  Spots may coalesce forming large brown areas.  Symptoms of oak anthracnose are most severe on the lower, inside branches where humidity levels are higher.  Raking leaves in the fall and pruning dead or dying branches (at the appropriate time of year) helps reduce the number of new infections the following year.

We are also pleased to announce that Brian Watkins of Arborworks has generously offered to work on a pro bono basis with the Land Trust to establish a regular and ongoing annual maintenance regiment for the tree.  As part of his recommendations, the Land Trust will be placing a number of rocks around the base area of the tree to discourage the parking of cars near the Oak’s root system and we ask you to take note of this request.

The Land Trust takes its role as the steward of its properties seriously and will continue to monitor this situation closely to do all we can to return our majestic Granby Oak to its full health.

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Award-Winning Author and UConn Geology Professor Robert Thorson to Discuss History of New England Stone Walls at September 18th Land Trust Event

August 22, 2005

On Sunday, September 18th, the Granby Land Trust is hosting a special event on its Mary Edwards Mountain Property featuring UConn Geology Professor Robert Thorson. The author of Stone by Stone:  The Magnificent History in New England’s Stone Walls, Thorson will give a lunch-time talk on New England’s natural history and the significance of New England’s fabled stone walls.

This special event is free for Granby Land Trust members and will start at 12 noon at the Land Trust’s beautiful 200-acre Mary Edwards Mountain Property with a picnic lunch/talk followed by a hike around the property’s new trails. Professor Thorson will also do a book signing as part of the event.  A picnic lunch is available and must be ordered in advance.

Robert M. Thorson is a professor of geology and geophysics at the University of Connecticut whose specialty is the origin and nature of land forms.  He is a member of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Geophysical Union, the Geological Society of America, and the Connecticut Academy of Arts and Sciences.  His book—Stone by Stone—was the winner of the 2003 Connecticut Book Award for Nonfiction.

Thorson’s book has received much acclaim.  The Boston Globe said that Stone by Stone is “An open invitation to head into the country oneself and explore a stone wall.”  The Dallas Morning News remarked that the book is a “fascinating study of New England’s landmarks that are as much about art as geology.”

Those planning to attend this event on Sunday, September 18th should RSVP to Rick Orluk at 860.653.7095 or to Rick_Orluk@GoldOrluk.com by September 12th.  Attendees can order a picnic lunch made by Susan at Lost Acres Orchard.  This lunch is $8.50 for adults and $5.00 for kids 10 and under – it includes a Roast Turkey Wrap, Pasta Side Salad, Fruit, Oatmeal Cookie and a Drink.  For more information about this event, please visit www.GranbyLandTrust.org or call Rick Orluk.

The Granby Land Trust works to preserve Granby’s Natural Heritage through the conservation of its scenic vistas, open space corridors, wildlife habitat, ecologically sensitive areas, and agricultural land.  Working with a range of conservation partners, the Land Trust is committed to forever preserving Granby’s rural character and its beautiful places.  For more information about the Land Trust’s history, membership and activities, please visit www.GranbyLandTrust.org .

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Granby Land Trust to Hold Family Hike on Mary Edwards Mountain Property on July 16th

June 22, 2005           

GRANBY, CT – The Granby Land Trust invites citizens to join us for a Family Hike on Saturday, July 16th on the Mary Edwards Mountain Property located off of Mountain Road.  

GLT board member Leslie Judge will lead this Family Hike.  The walk – designed for hikers of all ages interested in exploring the outdoors - will start at 9:00AM and take place on the new hiking trails on the Land Trust’s 188-acre Mary Edwards Mountain Property donated by Mary Edwards in 2000.  This event is open to the public, but we encourage interested hikers to RSVP to Leslie Judge at  860.653.4733 or email at LLJudge@Travelers.com.  Hikers should meet at the upper entrance to the Mary Edwards Property located just north of Silkey Road on Mountain Road in North Granby.

Since its founding in 1972, the Granby Land Trust has worked to preserve Granby's Natural Heritage through the conservation of its scenic vistas, open space corridors, wildlife habitat, ecologically sensitive areas, and agricultural land.  To become a member of the Granby Land Trust or learn more upcoming Granby Land Trust events, please visit our website at www.GranbyLandTrust.org.

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Brian Behrens Helps Granby Land Trust As Part of Eagle Scout Project

Granby, CT – Granby Boy Scout Brian Behrens recently completed a project for the Granby Land Trust to achieve the prestigious rank of Eagle Scout.

For his Eagle Scout project, Brian constructed and installed four trailhead signs for the Granby Land Trust’s Mary Edwards Mountain, Western Barn Door Hill and the Godard Preserve properties.  Each Trailhead consists of a signboard with a roof, a map holder and a box for brochures/trail guides about each Land Trust property. 

In order to fund the project, Brian enlisted the help of fellow scouts to sell candles to family and friends.  Brian sold over 100 candles and the sale proceeds along with donations produced $703 towards the project.  Using the money from his fundraiser, Brian bought the required cedar posts and various supporting pieces. Over the next several days, he spent many hours building the trailheads.  Once the construction was done, Brian and his fellow scouts installed the trailheads at the Godard property, the Mary Edwards property and the Western Barn Door Hill property so that they will provide useful information to hikers enjoying the Land Trust properties for many years to come.

Trailhead signs at both Mary Edwards and the Western Barn Door Hills properties will have brochures and maps inserted soon as the trails are still under construction.  The Godard Preserve trails are complete and maps are posted at each of the trailhead signs. 

The Granby Land Trust is extremely grateful to Brian and his fellow scouts for their work and congratulates him on achieving the rank of Eagle Scout.  To learn more about the Granby Land Trust and its properties or become a GLT member, visit www.GranbyLandTrust.org. To see Brian’s good work, visit the GLT’s Mary Edwards Mountain, Western Barn Door Hill or Godard Preserves.

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Granby Land Trust Writes Congresswoman Nancy Johnson to Oppose Weakening of Conservation Tax Incentives

May 23, 2005

The Honorable Nancy L. Johnson

United States House of Representatives

2409 Rayburn Building

Washington, DC 20515

Dear Congresswoman Johnson:

I am writing to you on behalf of the Granby Land Trust of Granby, Connecticut which works to preserve Granby’s Natural Heritage through the preservation of its scenic vistas, open space corridors, wildlife habitat, ecologically sensitive areas, and agricultural land.  Since our founding in 1972, we have successfully protected over 1600 acres in Granby through either land gifts (1100 acres) or conservation easements (500 acres).

We are greatly concerned to see that the Joint Committee on Taxation is considering major changes in the treatment of landowners who have generously donated land or a conservation easement for this purpose.   We wanted you to know that the donations we have received (and others we are working with landowners on) have been very important to us, and to our community.

Recently, the Granby Land Trust acquired, through a gift, a 93.5-acre parcel in West Granby which will likely be the catalyst to generate additional land donations in that area of town.  At the same time, we have just negotiated a conservation easement on a 40-acre parcel of agricultural land in North Granby that will protect this open space as farmland for generations to come.  Both of these land conservation gifts would not have happened had the landowners been unable to receive a tax reward for making these increasingly valuable donations of land or development rights.

We are very supportive of holding such donations, and donees such as our organization, to high standards.   (Our board has adopted the Land Trust Standards and Practices promulgated by the Land Trust Alliance). We would support changes in the law, in regulations, and in enforcement, that would ensure that high standards are met.   But the changes suggested by the Joint Committee on Taxation would result in landowners receiving little, if any, tax reward for making extremely valuable donations of development rights.  

These changes, if adopted, would have a dramatic and detrimental impact on some of the nation’s most effective conservation tools.  Donors would be far less willing to make the financial sacrifices involved in donations of conservation easements or bargain sales of land.  In every case, at least if the requirements of current law are complied with, as they should be, conservation donors suffer real financial costs.  It makes no policy sense to deny them the corresponding tax deductions.

We would like you to learn more about the work the Granby Land Trust is doing, and are confident that if you do, you will agree with us that the donations we receive are valuable assets for generations to come.  You can learn more about the Granby Land Trust, our protected properties and our conservation efforts at www.GranbyLandTrust.org or by calling me at 860.653.7095.  We also extend you an open invitation to attend one of our special events or a Land Trust board meeting to see and hear about the important work we are doing to preserve Granby’s rural character.

Thank you for your thoughtful consideration of these issues – our land conservation success in Granby is a clear indication that the current system works. 

Sincerely,

Rick Orluk
President
Granby Land Trust

Cc:  Granby Land Trust Board of Directors

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Granby Land Trust Announces Upcoming Special Events
May 17, 2005 

GRANBY, CT – The Granby Land Trust invites citizens to participate in several upcoming special events on Land Trust Properties.

On Sunday, June 12th, GLT Board Member Dave Emery will lead a Natural History Hike on the Holcomb Hill Property located on Simsbury Road just south of Holcomb Farm.  This hour and a half hike will start at 1:00PM and will explore some of the interesting geological features on this 60-acre property recently donated by P.K. Allen. This event is open to the public, but we encourage interested hikers to RSVP to Dave Emery at 860.653.3746 or by email at DWE79@aol.com .  Hikers should meet just beyond the bridge over Salmon Brook on Simsbury Road just south of Holcomb Farm.

In July, Leslie Judge will lead a Family Hike on Saturday, July 16th on the Mary Edwards Mountain Property located off of Mountain Road.   This hike will start at 9:00AM and take place on the new hiking trails on the Land Trust’s 188-acre property donated by Mary Edwards in 2000.  This event is open to the public, but we encourage interested hikers to RSVP to Leslie Judge at  860.653.4733 or email at LLJudge@Travelers.com.  Hikers should meet at the upper entrance to the Mary Edwards Property located just north of Silkey Road on Mountain Road in North Granby.

And, mark your calendars now for a special event with UConn geology professor Robert Thorson – author of Stone by Stone: The Magnificant History in New England’s Stone Walls – that will be held on Sunday, September 18th on the Mary Edwards Mountain Property.  Professor Thorson will give a short talk and then lead a hike.  This special event will be open to Granby Land Trust members only. Check the Land Trust website at www.GranbyLandTrust.org for event details.  You can learn more about Professor Thorson’s stone wall research at www.stonewall.uconn.edu .

Since its founding in 1972, the Granby Land Trust has worked to preserve Granby's Natural Heritage through the conservation of its scenic vistas, open space corridors, wildlife habitat, ecologically sensitive areas, and agricultural land.  To become a member of the Granby Land Trust or learn more upcoming Granby Land Trust events, please visit our website at www.GranbyLandTrust.org .

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Granby Land Trust Spring Bird Walk Scheduled for Saturday, May 7th on Godard Preserve
May 2, 2005

The Granby Land Trust is hosting a Spring Bird Walk this Saturday morning, May 7th, from 7:00 AM to 9:00 AM at the Land Trust’s Godard Preserve.

The bird walk will be led by GLT Member and avid birder John Weeks. The walk will begin at 7:00 AM at the entrance to the Godard Preserve which is located on Donahue Road (approximately 1/2 mile down on right from intersection with Mountain Road) in North Granby. This event is open to the public, but space is limited -- please RSVP to John Weeks by calling 860.844.8965. Birders should bring binoculars.

The 108-acre Godard Preserve was donated to the Granby Land Trust in December 1997 by Alice H. Godard in memory of the Godard Family which has enjoyed it since Colonial days. The Godard Preserve is open to the public and includes a well-marked trail system.
Since its founding in 1972, the Granby Land Trust has worked to preserve Granby's Natural Heritage through the conservation of its scenic vistas, open space corridors, wildlife habitat, ecologically sensitive areas, and agricultural land. For more information about this or other upcoming Granby Land Trust events, please visit our website at www.GranbyLandTrust.org.

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Schlicht Family Donates 94-Acres in West Granby to Land Trust
April 28, 2005

Earlier this year, Robert, Doreen and daughter Abigail Schlicht of Granby generously donated a 94-acre parcel of land in the Old Messenger Road area in West Granby to the Land Trust.  Featuring beautiful waterfalls, views and interesting hillside terrain, the Schlict Family gift was made in honor of the Granby Police Department.

Calling it one of the “most satisfying and meaningful moments in his life,” Bob Schlicht and his family wished to have this property “protected forever” and their gift to the Land Trust accomplishes that goal.  

The Schlichts have always felt strongly about Granby, its rural nature and land preservation.  When they moved to Granby 15 years ago, they were seeking a town in the Farmington Valley that still had extensive open space.  According to the Schlichts, Granby offered good “horse country” and reminded Bob of the town he grew up in -- Roxbury, Connecticut.   Bob and Doreen have also witnessed the success of land preservation efforts underway in Southern Pines, North Carolina where their second home is and wished to be a part of Granby’s efforts to preserve its natural heritage.

In addition to preserving the land, the Schlichts also wanted to honor the Granby Police Department.  To be known as The Schlicht Family Preserve given in honor of the Granby Police Department, the Land Trust intends to eventually provide public access to this property and clear trails like those on the Mary Edwards Mountain Property and Godard Preserve properties so that all may enjoy this beautiful piece of land.

“To give something away knowing it will be protected forever and enjoyed by generations to come…that is a real special moment in our lives,” remarked Bob.  We at the Granby Land Trust agree and thank the Schlicht Family for your generosity, foresight and trust.

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Granby Land Trust Holds Spring Preserve Our Properties Day
April 10, 2005

Copy to come

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Ray Betts Awarded Granby Land Trust’s Highest Honor
October 24, 2004

By Rick Orluk and Put Brown

Over the course of the last year, two of the Granby Land Trust’s most generous friends passed away. One is Mary Edwards, one of the earliest sponsors of the Land Trust, who supported the organization both financially and with enormous gifts of land, including the beautiful 200-acre Mary Edwards Mountain Property.

The other is Ray Betts, who served for years as a member of the Land Trust’s Board of Directors, including as its President, and who always was an outspoken champion of its mission.

Edwards was such an inspiration to the Land Trust board that, upon her passing, the Land Trust’s board of directors voted to create an annual award in her honor. Deemed the “Mary Edwards Friend of the Land Trust Award,” it is the Land Trust’s highest honor.

On October 24, at the Granby Land Trust’s Annual Meeting, the first “Mary Edwards Friend of the Land Trust Award” was given, posthumously, to Ray Betts, in recognition of his service and dedication to the Land Trust.  In particular, Ray loved the Granby Oak and led the effort to preserve it. The preservation of this natural landmark, around which the Town’s corporate seal is built, was Ray Betts’s gift to the community.

Over the years, Ray Betts repeatedly urged the Land Trust to purchase the two-acre parcel on which the Granby Oak sits. He forged close relationships with members of the Dewey family, who owned the land; and when it came time to sharpen the pencil and structure the acquisition package, he served as the Land Trust’s principal negotiator. (The Land Trust then raised the necessary funds to purchase this property from the community and from the Hartford Foundation for Public Giving.)

During the time it took him to convince the board, the Dewey family, and the townspeople that preserving this property was the right thing to do, Ray diligently mowed the grass under it and worked with consulting arborists to establish a maintenance routine.

Today, people come from far away to look at the magnificent spread of this landmark tree, to take pictures of children sitting on its low hanging branches and just to be close to something that old. One wonders what might have happened to the Oak had Ray Betts not been there to take its mission on as his own, and preserve the property for all to enjoy.

The Granby Land Trust is proud to honor Ray Betts with its “Mary Edwards Friend of the Land Trust Award.”

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Granby Land Trust Holds Annual Meeting Elects Officers and Board Members
October 24, 2004

The Granby Land Trust held its Annual Meeting on October 24 at the Emery Farm on Loomis Street. The meeting was preceded by a hike of the beautiful property behind the Emery Farm, with its enchanting trails and panoramic views. A portion of the property hiked is protected from development through a Granby Land Trust conservation easement.

At the meeting, the following officers were elected to the board of directors: Rick Orluk, President; Mark Wetzel, Vice President; Dave Russell, Treasurer; and Leslie Judge, Secretary. In addition, Fran Armentano, Put Brown and Dave Russell were elected to additional three-year terms as board members and Paula Johnson was elected to the board. The meeting concluded with the presentation of the Mary Edwards Award to Ray Betts, a longtime Land Trust member, officer and outspoken advocate.

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Drummer Letter to the Editor
October 18, 2004

To the Editor:

I write as president of the Granby Land Trust to comment on two letters that appeared in recent issues of The Granby Drummer. In September, John Stoppel fretted that "more houses are being built at such a rapid clip that the rural character is slipping away," and suggested that the citizens "create a park or two" to stem the tide. In October, Thomas Lembessis replied that these newly built houses aren't so bad and, in any event, help the tax base.

Mr. Stoppel is right to worry about the pace of development in Granby. Wildlife corridors, scenic vistas, recreational areas, buffer areas, farms, and, in spite of what Mr. Lembessis thinks, the tax base, are all at risk. Everyone who shares these concerns should join the Land Trust. Its motto, "Preserving Granby's Natural Heritage," exactly describes its mission. It not only preserves the rural character of the town, it also helps the tax base. This latter point is worth emphasizing.

Study after study, conducted by independent experts, have established that each new house in a town such as Granby adds more costs than the taxes it generates, primarily because of the attendant educational costs. There are exceptions for houses lived in by "empty nesters," but most new houses are built for families with school-aged children.

The Land Trust has been fantastically successful in achieving its goals since its founding in 1972. Not only has it acquired in its own name about 1,000 acres and conservation easements over about 500 additional acres, it also has worked with "sister" organizations -- including the Town, the State, The Nature Conservancy, the McLean Game Refuge, the Holcomb Farm and others -- to preserve thousands of other acres. In fact -- and this may come as a surprise to many -- this group of organizations has preserved more land in the past ten years than has been developed. Together, we have preserved the Dewey Granby Oak, Mary Edwards' "Mountain Property," the Western Barn Door Hill, the 100-acre Godard Preserve, the 525-acre Worthen Farm, the Ahrens Farm, the Costello property, the McLean Game Refuge's 450-acre Caruso Collamore Carpenter Preserve, its 80-acre Schiro Preserve and its 50-acre Thibodeau Preserve, and many, many other parcels. Just look on the Land Trust's web page (www.GranbyLandTrust.org) to see a map of some of these holdings.

Furthermore, the Selectmen have appointed a blue-ribbon land acquisition committee, chaired by Sally King, and that group has been actively working to identify and negotiate the purchase of additional properties worthy of protection.

The Granby Land Trust has been involved, one way or another, in all of these activities and continues to creatively and energetically seek to preserve Granby's open spaces. For more information or to join the Land Trust, please call me at 860.653.7095 or email me at Orluk@cox.net. We invite all who share our vision of Granby's future to join in the work we do.

Sincerely,

Rick Orluk
President, Granby Land Trust, Inc.

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What Trees are These? Common Species of the Farmington River Valley.
Saturday, September 18, 2004

8:30–11:30 a.m.; Holcomb Farm, 113 Simsbury Rd., West Granby, CT

Given and led by Sheila Connor from Harvard University’s Arnold Arboretum.

As a Horticultural Research Archivist at the Harvard University’s world-renowned Arnold Arboretum Horticultural Library, Sheila Connor is the author of the book New England Natives: a Celebration of People and Trees, which was published by the Harvard University Press.

Coffee and donuts will be served and following Sheila’s talk at 9 a.m., she will lead a walk through the adjacent Holcomb Farm and GLT Properties to identify the trees of the Farmington Valley.

This event is free for Granby Land Trust Members and will take place rain or shine.

Attendees are limited and will be accepted on a first-come, first-served basis. PLEASE RSVP to Rick Orluk at 860.653.7095 or orluk@cox.net

This event is presented by Granby Land Trust, Holcomb Farm, and Simsbury Land Trust.

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www.granbylandtrust.org, PO Box 23, Granby, CT 06035